B.A. in Humanities

Specialization in English

Building on the general studies foundation, you’ll take a core of Humanities coursework—as well as an English specialization—to prepare you for a career in communications, journalism or law (or to pursue a professional degree in one of these areas). 

Minors

Students who are not majoring in Humanities may receive a minor in Literature or a concentration in Professional Communication Arts.

At a Glance
120 credit hours
8 full-time semesters
2.0 GPA
Projects in the Humanities Capstone course
How to Earn Your Degree

In order to earn your degree, you’ll need to complete the courses listed below. 

Humanities Core
ARTS 101 Introduction to Visual Arts
Course ID
ARTS 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of the art and culture of various periods with emphasis on the artists’ conceptual and perceptual basis, materials and techniques, and artistic style. The course is designed to develop an understanding of the process and product of visual arts activity. For the non-art major. Fall, Spring.

ARTS 205 Art History
Course ID
ARTS 205
Credit Hours
3

A survey of the history and development of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts from pre-historic times to the present. Spring.

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 205 World Literature II
Course ID
ENGL 205
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from 1750 to the present. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: a grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 102 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 304 Approaches to Literature
Course ID
ENGL 304
Credit Hours
3

An analytical study of literature, stressing various methods of practical criticism. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 409 Advanced Research
Course ID
ENGL 409
Credit Hours
3

Teaches strategies for writing academic papers, conducting and writing research, and improving overall writing skills. Focus is academic writing including researching, writing proposals, orally presenting research, and a thesis-driven research paper. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

HUMN 150 Introduction to Fine Arts
Course ID
HUMN 150
Credit Hours
3

Introduces the student to selected examples of music and the visual arts representing the sociocultural influences and stylistic trends of various periods. The conceptual basis, materials, techniques, and more subtle aspects of creativity will be emphasized. Fall, Spring.

HUMN 222 Introduction to Philosophy
Course ID
HUMN 222
Credit Hours
3

Introduces the student to propositional logic and its systematic application to major philosophical areas of inquiry, including moral theory, political theory, and the philosophy of religion. Special emphasis will be placed on argumentation and critique in oral and written assignments. PRE: ENGL 101 (C or Higher) Spring.

HUMN 499 Projects in Humanities
Course ID
HUMN 499
Credit Hours
1-3 (per semester, may be repeated to max. of 6 hours)

Approved projects requiring student research culminating in a written report and oral presentation. PR: ENGL 304, ENGL 409. Spring.

MUSC 150 Introduction to Music
Course ID
MUSC 150
Credit Hours
3

Designed to introduce the student to selected masterpieces of music from the several periods, Renaissance through twentieth Century, and to lead the student to an understanding of the relationship of music to general culture. Fall/Spring.

You must also take 6 hours of a foreign language.

*In place of HUMN 222 Introduction to Philosophy, you may take HUMN 223 Introduction to Ethics.
Semester 1

In addition to the courses below, you must also take:

  • a Math course,
  • a Foreign Language I course.
ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

HUMN 150 Introduction to Fine Arts
Course ID
HUMN 150
Credit Hours
3

Introduces the student to selected examples of music and the visual arts representing the sociocultural influences and stylistic trends of various periods. The conceptual basis, materials, techniques, and more subtle aspects of creativity will be emphasized. Fall, Spring.

Semester 2

In addition to the courses below, you must also take:

  • a Technology Literacy course,
  • a Foreign Language II course.
ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

HIST 102 World Civilizations II
Course ID
HIST 102
Credit Hours
3

A study of world civilization from the Age of Absolutism to the present with emphasis on the development of global culture. Spring.

ARTS 101 Introduction to Visual Arts
Course ID
ARTS 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of the art and culture of various periods with emphasis on the artists’ conceptual and perceptual basis, materials and techniques, and artistic style. The course is designed to develop an understanding of the process and product of visual arts activity. For the non-art major. Fall, Spring.

Semester 3

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Physical or Biology Science I with Lab.

MUSC 150 Introduction to Music
Course ID
MUSC 150
Credit Hours
3

Designed to introduce the student to selected masterpieces of music from the several periods, Renaissance through twentieth Century, and to lead the student to an understanding of the relationship of music to general culture. Fall/Spring.

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

Core Skills Health & Wellness
Course ID
Core Skills
Credit Hours
2
*In place of COMM 201 Basic Communication, you may take COMM 208 Fundamentals of Speech.
Semester 4

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Physical or Biology Science I with Lab.

ARTS 205 Art History
Course ID
ARTS 205
Credit Hours
3

A survey of the history and development of architecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts from pre-historic times to the present. Spring.

ENGL 205 World Literature II
Course ID
ENGL 205
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from 1750 to the present. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: a grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 102 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

HUMN 222 Introduction to Philosophy
Course ID
HUMN 222
Credit Hours
3

Introduces the student to propositional logic and its systematic application to major philosophical areas of inquiry, including moral theory, political theory, and the philosophy of religion. Special emphasis will be placed on argumentation and critique in oral and written assignments. PRE: ENGL 101 (C or Higher) Spring.

ENGL 292 Advanced Composition
Course ID
ENGL 292
Credit Hours
3

Intensive practice in specialized writing skills such as the popular article. The Professional Article, the Personal Essay, the Formal Essay, and the Critical Review. PR: ENGL 102. Spring.

*In place of HUMN 222 Introduction to Philosophy, you may take HUMN 223 Introduction to Ethics.
Semester 5

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take 3 hours of a restricted elective or a course in your concentration.

ENGL 301 English Grammar
Course ID
ENGL 301
Credit Hours
3

A comprehensive course comprising the major rules of Standard American English (SAE) usage, sentence structure, mechanics, and conventions. Includes pedagogical approaches to teaching grammar. PR: ENGL 101, ENGL 102. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 302 Major British Authors
Course ID
ENGL 302
Credit Hours
3

A survey of representative works of the principal figures in British literature from Beowulf to the present with special attention to stylistic, religious, philosophical, and social trends. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

ENGL 304 Approaches to Literature
Course ID
ENGL 304
Credit Hours
3

An analytical study of literature, stressing various methods of practical criticism. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 305 Prose Fiction
Course ID
ENGL 305
Credit Hours
3

The background and forms of modern world prose fiction, with emphasis on critical analysis and interpretation of the significance, range, devices, and effects of the short story, the novella, and the novel as literary genres. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Spring.

Semester 6
ENGL 300 Major American Authors
Course ID
ENGL 300
Credit Hours
3

American writers representative of significant currents in our culture from the Puritan and Colonial period to the present, emphasizing nineteenth and twentieth century figures. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Spring.

ENGL 308 Linguistics
Course ID
ENGL 308
Credit Hours
3

A study of the terminology, phonology, morphology, and syntax of the English language, with an introduction to the concepts of transformational grammar. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

ENGL 307 Regional & Ethnic Literature
Course ID
ENGL 307
Credit Hours
3

A general survey of folkloric backgrounds of Appalachian and Afro-American literatures, tracing their respective developments from primitive to sophisticated forms. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Spring.

ENGL 235 Applied Studies in Language Arts
Course ID
ENGL 235
Credit Hours
3

One hour of class and two hours of directed projects, internships, and externships in the language arts to include areas of study in advertising, branding, public relations, dramatics, mass communication channels and technologies like print, radio, television and the internet with an emphasis on communication across small groups, organizations and culture. May be repeated to 6 hours. PR: ENGL 2 or Fundamentals of Speech 208. Spring.

ENGL 390 Topics in Literature
Course ID
ENGL 390
Credit Hours
3

Selected topics of worldwide literary importance or of popular interest and contemporary relevance. May be repeated for different topics, offered as announced. PR: ENGL 201 or 205, or consent of instructor. Spring.

Semester 7

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take 6 hours of a restricted elective or elective course.

ENGL 409 Advanced Research
Course ID
ENGL 409
Credit Hours
3

Teaches strategies for writing academic papers, conducting and writing research, and improving overall writing skills. Focus is academic writing including researching, writing proposals, orally presenting research, and a thesis-driven research paper. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

ENGL 490 Advanced Topics in Literature
Course ID
ENGL 490
Credit Hours
3

An in-depth study of a major, world-renowned writer or period in world literatures. May be repeated for different topics; offered as announced. PR: 6 hours from 300 level courses. Fall.

Semester 8

In addition to HUMN 499 Capstone Project, you must also take 6 hours of a restricted elective and 5 hours of an elective course.

English Specialization
Course List
ENGL 292 Advanced Composition
Course ID
ENGL 292
Credit Hours
3

Intensive practice in specialized writing skills such as the popular article. The Professional Article, the Personal Essay, the Formal Essay, and the Critical Review. PR: ENGL 102. Spring.

ENGL 300 Major American Authors
Course ID
ENGL 300
Credit Hours
3

American writers representative of significant currents in our culture from the Puritan and Colonial period to the present, emphasizing nineteenth and twentieth century figures. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Spring.

ENGL 301 English Grammar
Course ID
ENGL 301
Credit Hours
3

A comprehensive course comprising the major rules of Standard American English (SAE) usage, sentence structure, mechanics, and conventions. Includes pedagogical approaches to teaching grammar. PR: ENGL 101, ENGL 102. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 302 Major British Authors
Course ID
ENGL 302
Credit Hours
3

A survey of representative works of the principal figures in British literature from Beowulf to the present with special attention to stylistic, religious, philosophical, and social trends. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

ENGL 305 Prose Fiction
Course ID
ENGL 305
Credit Hours
3

The background and forms of modern world prose fiction, with emphasis on critical analysis and interpretation of the significance, range, devices, and effects of the short story, the novella, and the novel as literary genres. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Spring.

ENGL 306 Film Studies
Course ID
ENGL 306
Credit Hours
3

This course explores the complex interplay between film and literature. Selected novels, short stories and plays from around the world are analyzed in relation to film versions of the same works in order to gain an understanding of the possibilities -- and -- problems involved in the transposition to film. It also may set its focus specifically on movies as literature. PR: ENGL 201 or ENGL 205.

ENGL 307 Regional & Ethnic Literature
Course ID
ENGL 307
Credit Hours
3

A general survey of folkloric backgrounds of Appalachian and Afro-American literatures, tracing their respective developments from primitive to sophisticated forms. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Spring.

ENGL 308 Linguistics
Course ID
ENGL 308
Credit Hours
3

A study of the terminology, phonology, morphology, and syntax of the English language, with an introduction to the concepts of transformational grammar. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

ENGL 390 Topics in Literature
Course ID
ENGL 390
Credit Hours
3

Selected topics of worldwide literary importance or of popular interest and contemporary relevance. May be repeated for different topics, offered as announced. PR: ENGL 201 or 205, or consent of instructor. Spring.

ENGL 490 Advanced Topics in Literature
Course ID
ENGL 490
Credit Hours
3

An in-depth study of a major, world-renowned writer or period in world literatures. May be repeated for different topics; offered as announced. PR: 6 hours from 300 level courses. Fall.

Professional Communication Arts
Course Requirements
COMM 205 Interpersonal Communication
Course ID
COMM 205
Credit Hours
3

Designed to increase the student’s understanding and implementation of effective interpersonal (dyadic) communication behaviors and skills. Examines basic verbal and nonverbal elements affecting communication between individuals in family, peer group, and work contexts. Acquaints students with theoretical underpinnings of intercultural communication.

ENGL 235 Applied Studies in Language Arts
Course ID
ENGL 235
Credit Hours
3

One hour of class and two hours of directed projects, internships, and externships in the language arts to include areas of study in advertising, branding, public relations, dramatics, mass communication channels and technologies like print, radio, television and the internet with an emphasis on communication across small groups, organizations and culture. May be repeated to 6 hours. PR: ENGL 2 or Fundamentals of Speech 208. Spring.

JOUR 325 News Writing & Editing
Course ID
JOUR 325
Credit Hours
3

A study of effective techniques in application of journalistic theories and practices with emphasis on newsgathering, news writing, copy editing, layout, and newspaper nomenclature. PR: ENGL 102.

ENGL 208 Writing in the Professions
Course ID
ENGL 208
Credit Hours
3

Applied study in technical communications- written, oral, and visual media. Includes writing abstracts, proposals, research design and methodology, editing, proofing, and discipline-specific projects. PR: English 101. Spring.

COMM 340 Intercultural Communication
Course ID
COMM 340
Credit Hours
3

Focuses on the importance of culture in our everyday lives, and the ways in which culture interrelates with and affects communication processes. Designed to increase sensitivity to other cultures and to help the student to communicate effectively across cultural boundaries. Emphasizes awareness of diverse cultural backgrounds (including their own) and the contexts (social, cultural, and historical) within which we live and communicate. PR: COMM 205.

Restricted Electives

You may take any ARTS, ENGL, JOUR, COMM or HUMN courses that are not used to fulfill the Humanities core requirements or the English specialization.