B.A. in Social Science

Concentration in History, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology.

Drawing from all of the social science disciplines—which study the social life of human beings—this program will prepare you for professional degrees, such as law, as well as for a career in such fields as government or social service. 

You will use academic inquiry to develop a broad baseline of knowledge of how human societies function. 

At a Glance
120 credit hours
8 semesters
2.0 GPA
How to Earn Your Degree

First, you will complete the general studies requirement, followed by the social sciences core and at least one social sciences concentration. You may choose to specialize in one of the following areas: History, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology.

Required Coursework

You must complete the Social Sciences core (36 hours of Social Sciences + 18 hours of restricted electives). Additionally, 6 hours of foreign language credits are required.

Concentrations

Rather than selecting a major or minor degree, you will choose a specific area of study called a concentration. You may choose from one of the following four concentrations: History, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology. 
 

Core Requirements
ECON 211 Principles of Economics I (Macroeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 211
Credit Hours
3

An introductory analysis of macroeconomics concepts and issues, emphasizing aggregate demand, supply, and fiscal and monetary policies. Analysis of macroeconomic problems related to the American economy. Fall.

ECON 212 Principles of Economics II (Microeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 212
Credit Hours
3

Analysis of consumption and production behavior of household and business organizations. Topics include price and resource allocation and the behavior of firms under different types of market structure. Spring.

HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

MATH 210 Elementary Statistics
Course ID
MATH 210
Credit Hours
3

Basic programming; sets, basic probability concepts; basic statistical concepts; random variables and distributions; sampling distributions; linear regression and correlation. No field credit for math majors/minors. PR: MATH 101 or higher. Fall.

PSYC 103 General Psychology
Course ID
PSYC 103
Credit Hours
3

An introductory course in the principles of human behavior. It deals with topics such as scientific method in psychology, measurement, learning, development, perception, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, intelligence and others. Fall, Spring.

POSC 200 American National Government
Course ID
POSC 200
Credit Hours
3

Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution, governmental structure, the political process and selected policy outcomes. Fall, Spring. 

SOCI 210 Principles of Sociology
Course ID
SOCI 210
Credit Hours
3

Designed to acquaint the student with the scientific method as it is applied to the study of human behavior. A survey of social processes as they relate to culture and society forms the reference framework for the course. Fall, Spring.

SOCI 300 Social Research Methods
Course ID
SOCI 300
Credit Hours
3

Assists students to understand and apply basic quantitative and qualitative methods used to conduct social research. Students are introduced to a variety of research design, measurement, data collection and data analysis techniques. PR: MATH 210 or 301 and either PSYC 103 or SOCI 210. Spring.

SOCI 330 Social Class in America
Course ID
SOCI 330
Credit Hours
3

A study of the fundamental principles of social stratification with emphasis on the American class system. Attention given to the universality of social class and the persistence of social inequality in the United States. PR: SOCI 210. Fall.

SOSC 490 Seminar in Social Science
Course ID
SOSC 490
Credit Hours
3

The capstone course for social science majors assesses competence in social science core courses and in the area of specialization through a variety of assignments such as book critique, research paper and content exam. PR: Social science major and senior standing.

*In place of MATH 210 Elementary Statistics, you may take MATH 301 Probability & Statistics.
*In place of POSC 200 American National Government, you may take POSC 210 Introduction to Politics.
*In place of SOCI 300 Social Research Methods, you may take HIST 497 Research Methods in History OR PSYC 480 Research Design & Proposal.
History Concentration

In addition to the coursework below, you must complete the following:

12 hours of Restricted Electives from the following courses: HIST 290, 300, 301, 302, 305, 306, 307, 308, 400, 401, 403, 405, 406, 408, 490, 495.

9 hours of restricted electives from two of the following concentration areas: Political Science, Psychology or Sociology (18 hours, total)

  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 494, 498

  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 460, 490, 495

  • SOCI 290, 320, 323, 324, 330, 332, 410, 490, 495

Use HIST 497 to fulfill the Research Methods requirement.

HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

HIST 102 World Civilizations II
Course ID
HIST 102
Credit Hours
3

A study of world civilization from the Age of Absolutism to the present with emphasis on the development of global culture. Spring.

HIST 105 American History I
Course ID
HIST 105
Credit Hours
3

Study of the European background, colonial beginnings, the historical, economic, social and political growth of America prior to 1865. Fall.

HIST 106 American History II
Course ID
HIST 106
Credit Hours
3

Study of the historical, political, social, economic and cultural aspects of American
civilization since 1865. Spring.

History Concentration: Recommended Schedule
Semester 1

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take:

  • a Physical or Biological Science I and lab course, and
  • a Technology Literacy course.
ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

POSC 200 American National Government
Course ID
POSC 200
Credit Hours
3

Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution, governmental structure, the political process and selected policy outcomes. Fall, Spring. 

*In place of POSC 200 American National Government, you may take POSC 210 Introduction to Politics.
Semester 2

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Physical or Biological Science II course and a lab.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

HIST 102 World Civilizations II
Course ID
HIST 102
Credit Hours
3

A study of world civilization from the Age of Absolutism to the present with emphasis on the development of global culture. Spring.

PSYC 103 General Psychology
Course ID
PSYC 103
Credit Hours
3

An introductory course in the principles of human behavior. It deals with topics such as scientific method in psychology, measurement, learning, development, perception, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, intelligence and others. Fall, Spring.

*In place of COMM 201 Basic Communication, you may take COMM 208 Fundamentals of Speech.
Semester 3

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Foreign Language I class. 

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

ECON 211 Principles of Economics I (Macroeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 211
Credit Hours
3

An introductory analysis of macroeconomics concepts and issues, emphasizing aggregate demand, supply, and fiscal and monetary policies. Analysis of macroeconomic problems related to the American economy. Fall.

MATH 101 General Mathematics
Course ID
MATH 101
Credit Hours
3

Study of natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, equations, and inequalities; ratio, proportion and variation; graphs; interest; introduction to elementary statistics. Available to students scoring ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Fall, Spring.

HIST 105 American History I
Course ID
HIST 105
Credit Hours
3

Study of the European background, colonial beginnings, the historical, economic, social and political growth of America prior to 1865. Fall.

*In place of ENGL 201 World Literature I, you may take ENGL 205 World Literature II.
Semester 4

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take an elective course and a Foreign Language II course.

ECON 212 Principles of Economics II (Microeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 212
Credit Hours
3

Analysis of consumption and production behavior of household and business organizations. Topics include price and resource allocation and the behavior of firms under different types of market structure. Spring.

MATH 210 Elementary Statistics
Course ID
MATH 210
Credit Hours
3

Basic programming; sets, basic probability concepts; basic statistical concepts; random variables and distributions; sampling distributions; linear regression and correlation. No field credit for math majors/minors. PR: MATH 101 or higher. Fall.

HIST 106 American History II
Course ID
HIST 106
Credit Hours
3

Study of the historical, political, social, economic and cultural aspects of American
civilization since 1865. Spring.

Semester 5

In addition to the course listed below, you must take:

  • a Health & Wellness course, 
  • a restricted Social Science elective,*
  • a restricted History elective,** and
  • an elective course.

*You may choose from

  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 495, 498;
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 450, 460, 490, 495; or
  • SOCI 290, 320, 323, 324, 410, 480, 495.

**You may choose from HIST 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, or 495.

SOCI 330 Social Class in America
Course ID
SOCI 330
Credit Hours
3

A study of the fundamental principles of social stratification with emphasis on the American class system. Attention given to the universality of social class and the persistence of social inequality in the United States. PR: SOCI 210. Fall.

Semester 6

In addition to the courses listed below, you must take:

  • a restricted Social Science elective,*
  • a restricted History elective,** and
  • an elective course.

*You may choose from

  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 495, 498;
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 450, 460, 490, 495; or
  • SOCI 290, 320, 323, 324, 410, 480, 495.

**You may choose from HIST 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, or 495.

SOCI 210 Principles of Sociology
Course ID
SOCI 210
Credit Hours
3

Designed to acquaint the student with the scientific method as it is applied to the study of human behavior. A survey of social processes as they relate to culture and society forms the reference framework for the course. Fall, Spring.

HIST 497 Research Methods in History
Course ID
HIST 497
Credit Hours
3

A practical seminar in the techniques of historical research, the compilation and evaluation of sources and the writing of history. PR: 6 credits in history. Spring.

Semester 7

In this semester, it is suggested that you take:

  • two restricted Social Science electives,*
  • a restricted History elective,** and
  • a two elective courses.

*You may choose from

  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 495, 498;
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 450, 460, 490, 495; or
  • SOCI 290, 320, 323, 324, 410, 480, 495.

**You may choose from HIST 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, or 495.

Semester 8

In addition to the course listed below, you must take:

  • two restricted Social Science electives,*
  • a restricted History elective,** and
  • an elective course.

*You may choose from

  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 495, 498;
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 450, 460, 490, 495; or
  • SOCI 290, 320, 323, 324, 410, 480, 495.

**You may choose from HIST 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, or 495.

SOSC 490 Seminar in Social Science
Course ID
SOSC 490
Credit Hours
3

The capstone course for social science majors assesses competence in social science core courses and in the area of specialization through a variety of assignments such as book critique, research paper and content exam. PR: Social science major and senior standing.

Political Science Concentration

In addition to these courses, you must complete the following: 

12 hours of restricted electives from Political Science courses: POSC 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498.

9 hours of restricted electives from 2 of the following concentration areas: History, Psychology or Sociology (18 hours, total):

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 305, 306, 307, 308, 400, 401, 403, 405, 406, 408, 490, 495

  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 460, 490, 495

  • SOCI 290, 303, 310, 320, 323, 324, 332, 376, 410, 490, 495

Choose from either HIST 497, PSYC 480 or SOCI 300 to fulfill the Research Methods requirement.

POSC 200 American National Government
Course ID
POSC 200
Credit Hours
3

Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution, governmental structure, the political process and selected policy outcomes. Fall, Spring. 

POSC 218 State & Local Government
Course ID
POSC 218
Credit Hours
3

A comparative study of American state and local governments, with emphasis on federalism, federal and state relations, interstate regulations and the structure and political process of state and local governments. Spring.

POSC 300 Political Thought
Course ID
POSC 300
Credit Hours
3

 A survey of ancient, medieval, modern and post-modern political thought. Special attention given to contemporary political ideologies, including fundamentalism, feminism, environmentalism, communitarianism and multiculturalism. PR: POSC 200, POSC 210 or ENGL 201. Fall.

POSC 405 International Relations
Course ID
POSC 405
Credit Hours
3

Study of major concepts and approaches in world politics and analysis of process, institutions, problems of war and peace and contemporary trends. PR: POSC 200 or POSC 210. Spring.

*In place of POSC 200 American National Government, you may take POSC 210 Introduction to Politics.
Political Science Concentration: Recommended Schedule
Semester 1

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take:

  • a Physical or Biological Science I and lab course, and
  • a Technology Literacy course.
ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

POSC 200 American National Government
Course ID
POSC 200
Credit Hours
3

Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution, governmental structure, the political process and selected policy outcomes. Fall, Spring. 

*In place of POSC 200 American National Government, you may take POSC 210 Introduction to Politics.
Semester 2

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Physical or Biological Science II course and a lab.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

PSYC 103 General Psychology
Course ID
PSYC 103
Credit Hours
3

An introductory course in the principles of human behavior. It deals with topics such as scientific method in psychology, measurement, learning, development, perception, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, intelligence and others. Fall, Spring.

POSC 218 State & Local Government
Course ID
POSC 218
Credit Hours
3

A comparative study of American state and local governments, with emphasis on federalism, federal and state relations, interstate regulations and the structure and political process of state and local governments. Spring.

*In place of COMM 201 Basic Communication, you may take COMM 208 Fundamentals of Speech.
Semester 3

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Foreign Language I class. 

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

ECON 211 Principles of Economics I (Macroeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 211
Credit Hours
3

An introductory analysis of macroeconomics concepts and issues, emphasizing aggregate demand, supply, and fiscal and monetary policies. Analysis of macroeconomic problems related to the American economy. Fall.

MATH 101 General Mathematics
Course ID
MATH 101
Credit Hours
3

Study of natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, equations, and inequalities; ratio, proportion and variation; graphs; interest; introduction to elementary statistics. Available to students scoring ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Fall, Spring.

POSC 300 Political Thought
Course ID
POSC 300
Credit Hours
3

 A survey of ancient, medieval, modern and post-modern political thought. Special attention given to contemporary political ideologies, including fundamentalism, feminism, environmentalism, communitarianism and multiculturalism. PR: POSC 200, POSC 210 or ENGL 201. Fall.

*In place of ENGL 201 World Literature I, you may take ENGL 205 World Literature II.
Semester 4

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take an elective course and a Foreign Language II course.

ECON 212 Principles of Economics II (Microeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 212
Credit Hours
3

Analysis of consumption and production behavior of household and business organizations. Topics include price and resource allocation and the behavior of firms under different types of market structure. Spring.

MATH 210 Elementary Statistics
Course ID
MATH 210
Credit Hours
3

Basic programming; sets, basic probability concepts; basic statistical concepts; random variables and distributions; sampling distributions; linear regression and correlation. No field credit for math majors/minors. PR: MATH 101 or higher. Fall.

POSC 405 International Relations
Course ID
POSC 405
Credit Hours
3

Study of major concepts and approaches in world politics and analysis of process, institutions, problems of war and peace and contemporary trends. PR: POSC 200 or POSC 210. Spring.

Semester 5

In addition to the course listed below, you must take:

  • a Health & Wellness course, 
  • a restricted Social Science elective,*
  • a restricted Political Science elective,** and
  • an elective course.

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403,450, 460, 490, 495; or
  • SOCI 290, 300, 320, 323, 324, 410, 490, 495.

**You may choose from POSC 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498.

SOCI 330 Social Class in America
Course ID
SOCI 330
Credit Hours
3

A study of the fundamental principles of social stratification with emphasis on the American class system. Attention given to the universality of social class and the persistence of social inequality in the United States. PR: SOCI 210. Fall.

Semester 6

In addition to the courses listed below, you must take:

  • a restricted Social Science elective,*
  • a restricted Political Science elective,** and
  • an elective course.

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403,450, 460, 490, 495; or
  • SOCI 290, 300, 320, 323, 324, 410, 490, 495.

**You may choose from POSC 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498.

SOCI 210 Principles of Sociology
Course ID
SOCI 210
Credit Hours
3

Designed to acquaint the student with the scientific method as it is applied to the study of human behavior. A survey of social processes as they relate to culture and society forms the reference framework for the course. Fall, Spring.

HIST 497 Research Methods in History
Course ID
HIST 497
Credit Hours
3

A practical seminar in the techniques of historical research, the compilation and evaluation of sources and the writing of history. PR: 6 credits in history. Spring.

*In place of HIST 497 Research Methods in History, you may take SOCI 300 Social Research Methods or PSYC 480 Research Design & Proposal.
Semester 7

In this semester, it is suggested that you take:

  • two restricted Social Science electives,*
  • a restricted Political Science elective,** and
  • two elective courses.

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403,450, 460, 490, 495; or
  • SOCI 290, 300, 320, 323, 324, 410, 490, 495.

**You may choose from POSC 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498.

Semester 8

In addition to the course listed below, it is suggested that you take:

  • two restricted Social Science electives,*
  • a restricted Political Science elective,** and
  • two elective courses.

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403,450, 460, 490, 495; or
  • SOCI 290, 300, 320, 323, 324, 410, 490, 495.

**You may choose from POSC 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498.

SOSC 490 Seminar in Social Science
Course ID
SOSC 490
Credit Hours
3

The capstone course for social science majors assesses competence in social science core courses and in the area of specialization through a variety of assignments such as book critique, research paper and content exam. PR: Social science major and senior standing.

Psychology Concentration

In addition to the coursework below, you must complete the following: 

9 hours of restricted electives (PSYC 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 402, 460, 490, 495)

Choose 9 hours of restricted electives from 2 of the following concentration areas: History, Political Science, or Sociology (18 hours, total)

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 305, 306, 307, 308, 400, 401, 403, 405, 406, 408, 490, 495
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 494, 498
  • SOCI 290, 303, 310, 320, 323, 324, 332, 376, 410, 490, 495

Use PSYC 480 to fulfill the Research Methods requirement.
 

PSYC 210 Lifespan Human Development
Course ID
PSYC 210
Credit Hours
3

The lifespan covering the prenatal, early childhood, adolescent and adult stages. PR: PSYC 103. Fall, Spring.

PSYC 350 Health Psychology
Course ID
PSYC 350
Credit Hours
3

The application of psychological theories to understanding physical and mental illnesses, health promotion and the prevention and treatment of illness. Introduces the key concepts and methodologies important to health psychology and the skills to think analytically and critically about health issues. PR: PSYC103 and PSYC 210. Spring.

PSYC 401 Theories of Personality
Course ID
PSYC 401
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the theories of the development, description, dynamics and determinants of personality with the emphasis on the organization and functioning of personality both adaptive and maladaptive. PR: PSYC 103, PSYC 210 and 3 additional hours of psychology credits. Fall.

PSYC 403 Cognitive Psychology
Course ID
PSYC 403
Credit Hours
3

Based on the information-processing model, cognitive psychology investigates the functions of mind such as learning and memory, perception, knowledge organization, language acquisition, categorization and dysfunction, problem solving and expertise, intelligence, social cognition, animal intelligence/cognition and the problems of defining and investigating consciousness. PR: PSYC 103, PSYC 210 and 3 additional hours of psychology credits. Fall.

PSYC 450 Psychological Tests
Course ID
PSYC 450
Credit Hours
3

Designed to introduce the principles that underlie the development, use and interpretation of psychological assessment tools. Topics include test construction, scaling, norming, assessment interpretation issues and psychological assessment applications in industrial, vocational, clinical and research settings. Additionally, psychological assessment will be discussed in terms of social, legal and ethical concerns. PR: PSYC103, MATH 210 or MATH 301 or BUSN 310 and 6 additional hours of psychology. Spring.

Psychology Concentration: Recommended Schedule
Semester 1

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take:

  • a Physical or Biological Science I and lab course, and
  • a Technology Literacy course.
ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

PSYC 103 General Psychology
Course ID
PSYC 103
Credit Hours
3

An introductory course in the principles of human behavior. It deals with topics such as scientific method in psychology, measurement, learning, development, perception, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, intelligence and others. Fall, Spring.

Semester 2

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Physical or Biological Science II course and a lab.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

POSC 200 American National Government
Course ID
POSC 200
Credit Hours
3

Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution, governmental structure, the political process and selected policy outcomes. Fall, Spring. 

SOCI 210 Principles of Sociology
Course ID
SOCI 210
Credit Hours
3

Designed to acquaint the student with the scientific method as it is applied to the study of human behavior. A survey of social processes as they relate to culture and society forms the reference framework for the course. Fall, Spring.

*In place of COMM 201 Basic Communication, you may take COMM 208 Fundamentals of Speech.
*In place of POSC 200 American National Government, you may take POSC 210 Introduction to Politics.
Semester 3

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Foreign Language I class. 

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

ECON 211 Principles of Economics I (Macroeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 211
Credit Hours
3

An introductory analysis of macroeconomics concepts and issues, emphasizing aggregate demand, supply, and fiscal and monetary policies. Analysis of macroeconomic problems related to the American economy. Fall.

MATH 101 General Mathematics
Course ID
MATH 101
Credit Hours
3

Study of natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, equations, and inequalities; ratio, proportion and variation; graphs; interest; introduction to elementary statistics. Available to students scoring ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Fall, Spring.

PSYC 210 Lifespan Human Development
Course ID
PSYC 210
Credit Hours
3

The lifespan covering the prenatal, early childhood, adolescent and adult stages. PR: PSYC 103. Fall, Spring.

*In place of ENGL 201 World Literature I, you may take ENGL 205 World Literature II.
Semester 4

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take an elective course and a Foreign Language II course.

ECON 212 Principles of Economics II (Microeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 212
Credit Hours
3

Analysis of consumption and production behavior of household and business organizations. Topics include price and resource allocation and the behavior of firms under different types of market structure. Spring.

MATH 210 Elementary Statistics
Course ID
MATH 210
Credit Hours
3

Basic programming; sets, basic probability concepts; basic statistical concepts; random variables and distributions; sampling distributions; linear regression and correlation. No field credit for math majors/minors. PR: MATH 101 or higher. Fall.

PSYC 350 Health Psychology
Course ID
PSYC 350
Credit Hours
3

The application of psychological theories to understanding physical and mental illnesses, health promotion and the prevention and treatment of illness. Introduces the key concepts and methodologies important to health psychology and the skills to think analytically and critically about health issues. PR: PSYC103 and PSYC 210. Spring.

Semester 5

In addition to the courses listed below, you must take:

  • a Health & Wellness course, 
  • a restricted Social Science elective,* and a
  • a restricted Psychology elective.**

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498; or
  • SOCI 290, 310, 320, 323, 324, 410, 490, 495.

**You may choose from PSYC 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 402, 460, 490, 495.

PSYC 401 Theories of Personality
Course ID
PSYC 401
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the theories of the development, description, dynamics and determinants of personality with the emphasis on the organization and functioning of personality both adaptive and maladaptive. PR: PSYC 103, PSYC 210 and 3 additional hours of psychology credits. Fall.

SOCI 330 Social Class in America
Course ID
SOCI 330
Credit Hours
3

A study of the fundamental principles of social stratification with emphasis on the American class system. Attention given to the universality of social class and the persistence of social inequality in the United States. PR: SOCI 210. Fall.

Semester 6

In addition to the course listed below, you must take:

  • an elective, 
  • two restricted Social Science electives,* and a
  • a restricted Psychology elective.**

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498; or
  • SOCI 290, 310, 320, 323, 324, 410, 490, 495.

**You may choose from PSYC 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 402, 460, 490, 495.

PSYC 450 Psychological Tests
Course ID
PSYC 450
Credit Hours
3

Designed to introduce the principles that underlie the development, use and interpretation of psychological assessment tools. Topics include test construction, scaling, norming, assessment interpretation issues and psychological assessment applications in industrial, vocational, clinical and research settings. Additionally, psychological assessment will be discussed in terms of social, legal and ethical concerns. PR: PSYC103, MATH 210 or MATH 301 or BUSN 310 and 6 additional hours of psychology. Spring.

Semester 7

In addition to the course listed below, you must take:

  • two electives, 
  • a restricted Social Science elective,* and a
  • a restricted Psychology elective.**

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498; or
  • SOCI 290, 310, 320, 323, 324, 410, 490, 495.

**You may choose from PSYC 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 402, 460, 490, 495.

PSYC 403 Cognitive Psychology
Course ID
PSYC 403
Credit Hours
3

Based on the information-processing model, cognitive psychology investigates the functions of mind such as learning and memory, perception, knowledge organization, language acquisition, categorization and dysfunction, problem solving and expertise, intelligence, social cognition, animal intelligence/cognition and the problems of defining and investigating consciousness. PR: PSYC 103, PSYC 210 and 3 additional hours of psychology credits. Fall.

Semester 8

In addition to the courses listed below, you must take:

  • an elective, and
  • two restricted Social Science electives.*

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498; or
  • SOCI 290, 310, 320, 323, 324, 410, 490, 495.
PSYC 480 Research Design and Proposal
Course ID
PSYC 480
Credit Hours
3

As a “hands on” course, this course covers all of the basic concepts and practices needed to ask answerable research questions and design a study with faculty guidance. Principles are applied by developing a research design in a small group and technically writing the proposal. Classroom mini experiments promote learning of design, data collection and organization while directly experiencing the role of the researcher. Qualitative and quantitative research methods and designs are studied, but the primary emphasis is on quantitative research. Ethics issues are covered and students are required to complete a National Institutes of Health training course in “Protecting Human Research Participants.” The APA writing style will be taught and the outcome is demonstrated in the final research proposal. PR: PSYC 103; PSYC 403; MATH 210 or MATH 301; or BUSN 301, and permission of the instructor. Spring.

SOSC 490 Seminar in Social Science
Course ID
SOSC 490
Credit Hours
3

The capstone course for social science majors assesses competence in social science core courses and in the area of specialization through a variety of assignments such as book critique, research paper and content exam. PR: Social science major and senior standing.

Sociology Concentration

In addition to the coursework below, you must complete the following:

12 hours of restricted electives (SOCI 290, 320, 323, 332, 410, 490, 495)

Choose 9 hours of restricted electives from 2 of the following concentration areas: History, Political Science or Psychology (18 hours, total)

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 305, 306, 307, 308, 400, 401, 403, 405, 406, 408, 490, 495
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 494, 498
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 460, 490, 495
SOCI 210 Principles of Sociology
Course ID
SOCI 210
Credit Hours
3

Designed to acquaint the student with the scientific method as it is applied to the study of human behavior. A survey of social processes as they relate to culture and society forms the reference framework for the course. Fall, Spring.

SOCI 320 Introduction to Sociological Theories
Course ID
SOCI 320
Credit Hours
3

Introduces students to the major theoretical perspectives used in sociological inquiry and their applications to contemporary social analysis. Includes historical background of significant theorists and their theories from the nineteenth century through the present. PR: SOCI 210. Fall.

SOCI 324 Marriage and Family Relations
Course ID
SOCI 324
Credit Hours
3

Deals with the psychological factors inherent in marriage and family relations. Includes such premarital factors as dating, courtship and selection of a mate. Relates to the integration of personalities in the marital union and training of the progeny. PR: SOCI 210. Spring.

SOCI 330 Social Class in America
Course ID
SOCI 330
Credit Hours
3

A study of the fundamental principles of social stratification with emphasis on the American class system. Attention given to the universality of social class and the persistence of social inequality in the United States. PR: SOCI 210. Fall.

Sociology Concentration: Recommended Schedule
Semester 1

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take:

  • a Physical or Biological Science I and lab course, and
  • a Technology Literacy course.
ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

SOCI 210 Principles of Sociology
Course ID
SOCI 210
Credit Hours
3

Designed to acquaint the student with the scientific method as it is applied to the study of human behavior. A survey of social processes as they relate to culture and society forms the reference framework for the course. Fall, Spring.

Semester 2

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Physical or Biological Science II course and a lab.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

POSC 200 American National Government
Course ID
POSC 200
Credit Hours
3

Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution, governmental structure, the political process and selected policy outcomes. Fall, Spring. 

PSYC 103 General Psychology
Course ID
PSYC 103
Credit Hours
3

An introductory course in the principles of human behavior. It deals with topics such as scientific method in psychology, measurement, learning, development, perception, motivation, personality, abnormal behavior, intelligence and others. Fall, Spring.

*In place of COMM 201 Basic Communication, you may take COMM 208 Fundamentals of Speech.
*In place of POSC 200 American National Government, you may take POSC 210 Introduction to Politics.
Semester 3

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take a Foreign Language I class. 

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

ECON 211 Principles of Economics I (Macroeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 211
Credit Hours
3

An introductory analysis of macroeconomics concepts and issues, emphasizing aggregate demand, supply, and fiscal and monetary policies. Analysis of macroeconomic problems related to the American economy. Fall.

MATH 101 General Mathematics
Course ID
MATH 101
Credit Hours
3

Study of natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, equations, and inequalities; ratio, proportion and variation; graphs; interest; introduction to elementary statistics. Available to students scoring ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Fall, Spring.

SOCI 320 Introduction to Sociological Theories
Course ID
SOCI 320
Credit Hours
3

Introduces students to the major theoretical perspectives used in sociological inquiry and their applications to contemporary social analysis. Includes historical background of significant theorists and their theories from the nineteenth century through the present. PR: SOCI 210. Fall.

*In place of ENGL 201 World Literature I, you may take ENGL 205 World Literature II.
Semester 4

In addition to the courses listed below, you must also take an elective course and a Foreign Language II course.

ECON 212 Principles of Economics II (Microeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 212
Credit Hours
3

Analysis of consumption and production behavior of household and business organizations. Topics include price and resource allocation and the behavior of firms under different types of market structure. Spring.

MATH 210 Elementary Statistics
Course ID
MATH 210
Credit Hours
3

Basic programming; sets, basic probability concepts; basic statistical concepts; random variables and distributions; sampling distributions; linear regression and correlation. No field credit for math majors/minors. PR: MATH 101 or higher. Fall.

SOCI 324 Marriage and Family Relations
Course ID
SOCI 324
Credit Hours
3

Deals with the psychological factors inherent in marriage and family relations. Includes such premarital factors as dating, courtship and selection of a mate. Relates to the integration of personalities in the marital union and training of the progeny. PR: SOCI 210. Spring.

Semester 5

In addition to the course listed below, you must take:

  • a Health & Wellness course, and
  • two restricted Social Science electives.*

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498; or
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 450, 460, 490, 495.
SOCI 330 Social Class in America
Course ID
SOCI 330
Credit Hours
3

A study of the fundamental principles of social stratification with emphasis on the American class system. Attention given to the universality of social class and the persistence of social inequality in the United States. PR: SOCI 210. Fall.

Semester 6

In addition to the course listed below, you must take:

  • an elective, 
  • a restricted Social Science elective,* and
  • two restricted Sociology electives.**

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498; or
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 450, 460, 490, 495.

**You may choose from SOCI 290, 320, 323, 332, 410, 490, or 495.

HIST 497 Research Methods in History
Course ID
HIST 497
Credit Hours
3

A practical seminar in the techniques of historical research, the compilation and evaluation of sources and the writing of history. PR: 6 credits in history. Spring.

*In place of HIST 497 Research Methods in History, you may take PSYC 480 Research Design & Proposal or SOCI 300 Social Research Methods.
Semester 7

In this semester, it is suggested that you take:

  • an elective,
  • two restricted Social Science electives,* and
  • two restricted Sociology electives.**

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498; or
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 450, 460, 490, 495.

**You may choose from SOCI 290, 320, 323, 332, 410, 490, or 495.

Semester 8

In addition to the course listed below, you should take:

  • three electives, and
  • a restricted Social Science elective.*

*You may choose from

  • HIST 102, 105, 106, 290, 300, 301, 302, 308, 400, 401, 405, 406, 490, 495;
  • POSC 218, 290, 300, 312, 325, 350, 401, 404, 405, 490, 495, 498; or
  • PSYC 210, 290, 300, 312, 328, 329, 385, 401, 402, 403, 450, 460, 490, 495.
SOSC 490 Seminar in Social Science
Course ID
SOSC 490
Credit Hours
3

The capstone course for social science majors assesses competence in social science core courses and in the area of specialization through a variety of assignments such as book critique, research paper and content exam. PR: Social science major and senior standing.