B.S. in Early/Middle Education

With a specialization in Elementary Education, or Elementary Education and one or more middle school concentrations: English/Language Arts, Mathematics, General Science or Social Studies

Designed for aspiring elementary and middle school teachers, the program combines academic learning with hands-on experience so that you master both lesson material and teaching methods.

At a Glance
120 credit hours
8 full-time semesters
14 weeks of student teaching
How to Earn Your Degree

Once you’ve been accepted to the program, completing your B.S. in Early/Middle Education degree involves four main components: taking the required coursework; completing the “professional semester," which includes student teaching; submitting a student teaching portfolio; and passing the state required assessments.

Required Coursework

Courses within the B.S. in Early/Middle Education program are divided into two tracks: Elementary Education and Professional Education. Students wanting to teach middle school will choose one or more specializations in addition to that, requiring additional content courses.

Elementary Education K-6

The following courses will satisfy the requirements for both the General Studies and the Elementary Education programs.

ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 310 Children's Literature
Course ID
ENGL 310
Credit Hours
3

The selection, analysis, evaluation, and presentation of world literatures for children and adolescents, methods for using these materials in the classroom, appreciation for the depth and variety of such literatures, and exploration of the issues related to these texts. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

HIST 105 American History I
Course ID
HIST 105
Credit Hours
3

Study of the European background, colonial beginnings, the historical, economic, social and political growth of America prior to 1865. Fall.

HIST 106 American History II
Course ID
HIST 106
Credit Hours
3

Study of the historical, political, social, economic and cultural aspects of American
civilization since 1865. Spring.

POSC 200 American National Government
Course ID
POSC 200
Credit Hours
3

Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution, governmental structure, the political process and selected policy outcomes. Fall, Spring. 

MATH 101 General Mathematics
Course ID
MATH 101
Credit Hours
3

Study of natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, equations, and inequalities; ratio, proportion and variation; graphs; interest; introduction to elementary statistics. Available to students scoring ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Fall, Spring.

MATH 106 Math for Early/Middle Grade Teachers
Course ID
MATH 106
Credit Hours
3

Logical reasoning; geometry, measurements; metric system, numeration system; curriculum. No field credit for math majors or minor. PR: MATH 101 or higher. Fall & Spring

COSC 102 Computers & Society
Course ID
COSC 102
Credit Hours
3

A beginning course introducing the student to the use of computers and requiring no previous computer experience or technical background. The impact of computers on society is briefly discussed, along with an overview of the types, classifications, and functions of various computer hardware, software, and peripherals. The hands-on use of microcomputers is stressed and the ability to use word processing software is emphasized.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 301 English Grammar
Course ID
ENGL 301
Credit Hours
3

A comprehensive course comprising the major rules of Standard American English (SAE) usage, sentence structure, mechanics, and conventions. Includes pedagogical approaches to teaching grammar. PR: ENGL 101, ENGL 102. Fall, Spring.

HIST 302 History, Geography & Government of West Virginia
Course ID
HIST 302
Credit Hours
3

A survey course on the history, economy, and political life of West Virginia with a cursory consideration of its geographic background. PR: HIST 105 or 106. Fall.

GEOG 150 Introduction to Geography
Course ID
GEOG 150
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the study of geography as a social science emphasizing the relevance of geography to human problems, map reading, and place name recognition.

MATH 109 Algebra
Course ID
MATH 109
Credit Hours
3

Study of real numbers, exponents, roots and radicals; polynomials, first and second-degree equations and inequalities; functions and graphs. Required of students in Math Track A, i.e., students of Radiologic Science, Applied Science, Accountancy, Business Administration, Business Information Systems, or Health Services Management, who have scored an ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Also available to students who have successfully completed MATH 101. Fall, Spring.

MATH 333 Math Methods for K-6 Teachers
Course ID
MATH 333
Credit Hours
3

Instructional methods for teaching K-6 mathematics using a hands-on approach. Emphasis placed on increasing students’ ability to communicate and reason mathematically. Introduces a variety of techniques to approach and solve mathematical problems. PR: MATH 106. Spring.

HUMN 150 Introduction to Fine Arts
Course ID
HUMN 150
Credit Hours
3

Introduces the student to selected examples of music and the visual arts representing the sociocultural influences and stylistic trends of various periods. The conceptual basis, materials, techniques, and more subtle aspects of creativity will be emphasized. Fall, Spring.

MUSC 130 Music Skills for Classroom Teachers
Course ID
MUSC 130
Credit Hours
2

The study of music fundamentals and basic skills for classroom teachers. PR: Eligibility for enrollment in ENGL 101. 

PHED 333 P.E. in K-6 Grades
Course ID
PHED 333
Credit Hours
2

Emphasizes concepts, principles, materials and activities that should be incorporated in a physical education program in the early and middle grades. Required of all early and middle grade education students and includes field experiences in a public school setting. PR: Admission to Teacher Education.

BIOL 102 General Biology II
Course ID
BIOL 102
Credit Hours
3

An introductory course concerned with heredity gene function, evolution, human anatomy and physiology, and animal diversity. PR: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL 101. Spring.

BIOL 104L General Biology II Lab
Course ID
BIOL 104L
Credit Hours
1

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce lecture in BIOL 102. CO/PR: BIOL 102. Spring.

PHSC 101 Physical Science Survey I
Course ID
PHSC 101
Credit Hours
3

Introductory course for non-science majors containing basic principles of physics (mechanics, electricity, sound and light) and essentials of astronomy (the sun and its family). CO/PR: MATH 101 or equivalent. Fall.

PHSC 103L Laboratory for Physical Science Survey I
Course ID
PHSC 103L
Credit Hours
1

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce PHSC 101 lecture. Sessions consist of observing, reporting and interpreting physical phenomena. CO/PR: PHSC 101. Fall.

PHSC 102 Physical Science Survey II
Course ID
PHSC 102
Credit Hours
3

Introductory course for non-science majors containing elementary modern physics and the basic principles of chemistry, meteorology and earth science. CO/PR: MATH 101 or equivalent. Spring.

PHSC 104L Laboratory for Physical Science Survey II
Course ID
PHSC 104L
Credit Hours
1

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce PHSC 102 lecture. Sessions consist of observing, reporting and interpreting physical phenomena. CO/PR: PHSC 102. Spring.

HLTH 333 Health & Safety in Schools
Course ID
HLTH 333
Credit Hours
2

The elements of comprehensive school health programs are presented. Emphasis is placed on how teachers can maintain a healthy school environment. An overview of acute and chronic health problems of children is discussed. Candidates present health-related lessons in an elementary school. CPR and first aid are discussed as they relate and impact the school environment. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. Fall.

*In place of ENGL 201 World Literature I, you may take ENGL 205 World Literature II.
*In place of COMM 201 Basic Communication, you may take COMM 208 Fundamentals of Speech.
Professional Education

All Professional Education courses must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.

EDUC 110 Foundations of Education
Course ID
EDUC 110
Credit Hours
2

An examination of the historical, sociological and philosophical foundations of education. An introduction to the teaching profession. Students must complete a minimum of 20 hours in a classroom setting. PR: Eligibility for ENGL 101 Fall, Spring.

EDUC 160 Diversity & Education
Course ID
EDUC 160
Credit Hours
2

A study of the sociology of ethnicity and the influence on educational needs. Examines effective educational approaches for varied groups. PR: Eligibility for ENGL 101 Fall, Spring.

EDUC 200 Child/Adolescent Growth & Development
Course ID
EDUC 200
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course provides an overview of pre-natal through adolescent development A variety of early childhood programs as well as characteristics and needs of children are discussed. Topics included are principles, stages, and theories of development. A case study is required. PR EDUC 110 and ENG 101. Fall, Spring.

EDUC 280 General Methods
Course ID
EDUC 280
Credit Hours
2

This course encompasses areas related to classroom instruction and personal learning styles and will prepare students with knowledge, skills, and materials that can be used in a P-12 classroom. Topics include research on effective teaching, lesson planning, thematic units, instructional strategies, classroom management, discipline, cooperative learning, student diversity, and time management. PR: EDUC 110, 200.

SPED 310 Introduction to Special Education
Course ID
SPED 310
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the characteristics of exceptional and diverse learners and their education. The focus is on current issues in special education, laws related to special education, identification of exceptional learners, the referral process, individualized programming, accommodations for inclusion in regular classrooms, and collaboration with other professionals and parents. Students will research current issues and trends related to educating exceptional learners. PR: EDUC 110, 200. Fall and Summer

SPED 311 Teaching Special Needs Students in Inclusive Classrooms
Course ID
SPED 311
Credit Hours
3

Designed for education students who will teach diverse learners and students with special needs in inclusive settings. This course examines instructional methods proven effective in educating students with exceptionalities. Legal definitions, characteristics, prevalence and educational adaptations for each area of exceptionality are stressed. Legal rights of students with exceptionalities and their parents and the responsibilities of educators in addressing those rights are emphasized. PR: EDUC 110, 200, 310.Spring

READ 270 The Reading Process
Course ID
READ 270
Credit Hours
3

Attention will be given to reading skills and concepts and current practices in reading instruction in the early–middle grades. This course is required as the first course in the reading sequence. Students must complete 10 additional hours of clinical experience in a public school setting. PR: EDUC 200. Spring

EDUC 321 Instruction & Technology
Course ID
EDUC 321
Credit Hours
2

Provides candidates with the knowledge and skills to apply technology to teaching, learning, and curriculum. Objectives are based on ISTE Standards and 21st Century Learning Skills. Summer, Fall.

EDUC 322 Standards, Planning & Assessment
Course ID
EDUC 322
Credit Hours
2

Examines the interrelationships among content standards, instructional objectives, planning and assessment. Students will design instructional units based on standards, and will examine a variety of evaluation techniques, including standardized tests, teacher-made tests and authentic performance assessments. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. Summer, Spring.

EDUC 330 Teaching & Learning
Course ID
EDUC 330
Credit Hours
3

Overview of current research and theories of learning and classroom management. Topics include behavior and classroom management techniques including the physical environment, motivation, routines, times management and self-regulation. In the clinical portion of the class, students spend 64 hours as a supervised tutor in a school setting. Fall and Spring

EDUC 333 Teaching Science & Social Studies
Course ID
EDUC 333
Credit Hours
3

A study and application of current methods of teaching science and social studies content in the public schools. Spring.

READ 371 Teaching of Reading and Language Arts
Course ID
READ 371
Credit Hours
3

Classroom strategies for reading, listening, speaking, handwriting, spelling and grammar. PR: READ 270 and admission to Teacher Education. CO: EDUC 330. Fall and Spring

READ 360 Reading in the Content Area
Course ID
READ 360
Credit Hours
3

This course addresses issues and challenges related to teaching language and content to students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Implementation and evaluation of reading interventions for struggling readers, including improving overall level of reading achievement through building vocabulary, literal understanding, inferential reading and creative content application to increase comprehension retention, are covered. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. Fall and Summer

EDUC 474 Senior Seminar
Course ID
EDUC 474
Credit Hours
2

The purpose of the Senior Seminar is to help candidates continue to understand the teaching and learning process as well as demonstrating skills and abilities as a teacher. The seminar is two-fold: completion of an Action Research Project and a Senior Portfolio. Grade of C or better for successful completion. PR: Admission to the Professional Semester. Fall and Spring.

EDUC 475 Student Teaching
Course ID
EDUC 475
Credit Hours
10

Student will be assigned to a school for a full day of teaching for a minimum of 15 weeks. Student teaching is completed at the developmental levels and in the content areas for which the student expects to be certified. PR: Admission to Professional Semester. Fall and Spring

*READ 371: Before enrolling in READ 371, you will need to take READ 270.
*EDUC 322, READ 360, READ 371, EDUC 474 and EDUC 475 are restricted to students admitted to the Teacher Education Program and must be completed with a grade of "C" or better.
English/Language Arts (Grades 5-9)
ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 205 World Literature II
Course ID
ENGL 205
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from 1750 to the present. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: a grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 102 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

COMM 208 Fundamentals of Speech
Course ID
COMM 208
Credit Hours
3

Develops proficiency in oral communications through the learning of basic forms, uses, and techniques of public speaking. Emphasis is on practical aspects of speech writing, listening, and oral presentations. PR: a grade of “C” or better in English 102. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 300 Major American Authors
Course ID
ENGL 300
Credit Hours
3

American writers representative of significant currents in our culture from the Puritan and Colonial period to the present, emphasizing nineteenth and twentieth century figures. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Spring.

ENGL 301 English Grammar
Course ID
ENGL 301
Credit Hours
3

A comprehensive course comprising the major rules of Standard American English (SAE) usage, sentence structure, mechanics, and conventions. Includes pedagogical approaches to teaching grammar. PR: ENGL 101, ENGL 102. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 302 Major British Authors
Course ID
ENGL 302
Credit Hours
3

A survey of representative works of the principal figures in British literature from Beowulf to the present with special attention to stylistic, religious, philosophical, and social trends. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

ENGL 307 Regional & Ethnic Literature
Course ID
ENGL 307
Credit Hours
3

A general survey of folkloric backgrounds of Appalachian and Afro-American literatures, tracing their respective developments from primitive to sophisticated forms. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Spring.

ENGL 308 Linguistics
Course ID
ENGL 308
Credit Hours
3

A study of the terminology, phonology, morphology, and syntax of the English language, with an introduction to the concepts of transformational grammar. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

ENGL 310 Children's Literature
Course ID
ENGL 310
Credit Hours
3

The selection, analysis, evaluation, and presentation of world literatures for children and adolescents, methods for using these materials in the classroom, appreciation for the depth and variety of such literatures, and exploration of the issues related to these texts. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

ENGL 320 Adolescent Literature
Course ID
ENGL 320
Credit Hours
3

Examination of the types of world literatures suitable for adolescents, methods for using these materials in the classroom, appreciation for the depth and variety of such literatures, and exploration of issues related to these texts. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Spring.

ENGL 322 Teaching of Composition
Course ID
ENGL 322
Credit Hours
3

A survey of methods of teaching composition in secondary schools, with emphasis on recent developments in the teaching of high school composition. PR: Grade of C or better in ENGL 308. Spring.

ARSC 431 Methods of Teaching in Arts & Sciences
Course ID
ARSC 431
Credit Hours
3

Instructional techniques unique to academic subjects in Arts & Sciences. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. CO: EDUC 330. Fall.

*In place of ENGL 201 World Literature I, you may take ENGL 205 World Literature II.
*In place of COMM 201 Basic Communication, you may take COMM 208 Fundamentals of Speech.
General Science (Grades 5-9)
BIOL 101 General Biology I
Course ID
BIOL 101
Credit Hours
3

An introductory course concerned with the chemical and physical organization of life, cytology, plant anatomy and physiology, plant diversity, and ecology. PR: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL 101. Fall.

BIOL 103L General Biology I Lab
Course ID
BIOL 103L
Credit Hours
3

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce lecture in BIOL 101. CO/PR: BIOL 101. Fall.

BIOL 102 General Biology II
Course ID
BIOL 102
Credit Hours
3

An introductory course concerned with heredity gene function, evolution, human anatomy and physiology, and animal diversity. PR: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL 101. Spring.

BIOL 104L General Biology II Lab
Course ID
BIOL 104L
Credit Hours
1

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce lecture in BIOL 102. CO/PR: BIOL 102. Spring.

BIOL 300 Ecology
Course ID
BIOL 300
Credit Hours
3

A study of the relationships between organisms and the physical and biotic environment. Fieldwork emphasizes the local area. PR: BIOL 101, 103 or consent of instructor. Fall/ODD.

CHEM 100 Introduction to Chemistry
Course ID
CHEM 100
Credit Hours
3

Basic background in the area of chemistry for students planning to take general chemistry. This course will not meet the general studies requirements, but will meet the chemistry requirement for acceptance into health-related programs. PR: Eligibility for MATH 101 or higher or permission of the instructor and student’s advisor. Fall.

COSC 201 PC Software Applications
Course ID
COSC 201
Credit Hours
3

This course expands the student’s knowledge of microcomputers through the use of various productivity software packages such as word processors, spreadsheets, database management systems, and presentation application software. Projects relating to the individual’s major and hands-on use of the microcomputer are emphasized. CO: GNET 115 or MATH 109.

MATH 109 Algebra
Course ID
MATH 109
Credit Hours
3

Study of real numbers, exponents, roots and radicals; polynomials, first and second-degree equations and inequalities; functions and graphs. Required of students in Math Track A, i.e., students of Radiologic Science, Applied Science, Accountancy, Business Administration, Business Information Systems, or Health Services Management, who have scored an ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Also available to students who have successfully completed MATH 101. Fall, Spring.

PHSC 101 Physical Science Survey I
Course ID
PHSC 101
Credit Hours
3

Introductory course for non-science majors containing basic principles of physics (mechanics, electricity, sound and light) and essentials of astronomy (the sun and its family). CO/PR: MATH 101 or equivalent. Fall.

PHSC 103L Laboratory for Physical Science Survey I
Course ID
PHSC 103L
Credit Hours
1

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce PHSC 101 lecture. Sessions consist of observing, reporting and interpreting physical phenomena. CO/PR: PHSC 101. Fall.

PHSC 102 Physical Science Survey II
Course ID
PHSC 102
Credit Hours
3

Introductory course for non-science majors containing elementary modern physics and the basic principles of chemistry, meteorology and earth science. CO/PR: MATH 101 or equivalent. Spring.

PHSC 104L Laboratory for Physical Science Survey II
Course ID
PHSC 104L
Credit Hours
1

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce PHSC 102 lecture. Sessions consist of observing, reporting and interpreting physical phenomena. CO/PR: PHSC 102. Spring.

NASC 301 Integrated Science I
Course ID
NASC 301
Credit Hours
3

Provides the student the opportunity to integrate the physical and life sciences with technology to attain further knowledge in the areas of scientific methodology, physics, chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy. The student will investigate two major scientific themes: earth and ocean. PR: PHSC 101-104 and BIOL 101-104, or permission of instructor. Fall/Even.

NASC 302 Integrated Science II
Course ID
NASC 302
Credit Hours
3

Provides the student the opportunity to integrate the physical and life sciences with technology to attain further knowledge in the areas of scientific methodology, physics, chemistry, biology, geology, and astronomy. The student will investigate two major scientific themes: atmosphere and space. PR: NASC 301 or permission of instructor. Spring, Odd.

ARSC 431 Methods of Teaching in Arts & Sciences
Course ID
ARSC 431
Credit Hours
3

Instructional techniques unique to academic subjects in Arts & Sciences. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. CO: EDUC 330. Fall.

PHSC 314 Physical Geology and Laboratory
Course ID
PHSC 314
Credit Hours
4

Study of minerals and rocks of the crust and forces and agents involved in geologic processes that change the earth’s surface. Laboratory work includes study of rocks and minerals, topographic and geologic maps and field trips. PR: Completion of four hours of laboratory science.

Mathematics (Grades 5-9)
MATH 106 Math for Early/Middle Grade Teachers
Course ID
MATH 106
Credit Hours
3

Logical reasoning; geometry, measurements; metric system, numeration system; curriculum. No field credit for math majors or minor. PR: MATH 101 or higher. Fall & Spring

MATH 109 Algebra
Course ID
MATH 109
Credit Hours
3

Study of real numbers, exponents, roots and radicals; polynomials, first and second-degree equations and inequalities; functions and graphs. Required of students in Math Track A, i.e., students of Radiologic Science, Applied Science, Accountancy, Business Administration, Business Information Systems, or Health Services Management, who have scored an ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Also available to students who have successfully completed MATH 101. Fall, Spring.

MATH 110 Trigonometry
Course ID
MATH 110
Credit Hours
3

Trigonometric functions and graphs; solution of right triangles, trigonometric identities; solution of oblique triangles; vectors; complex numbers; exponential and logarithm functions. PR: ACT Mathematics main score of 19. Spring.

MATH 210 Elementary Statistics
Course ID
MATH 210
Credit Hours
3

Basic programming; sets, basic probability concepts; basic statistical concepts; random variables and distributions; sampling distributions; linear regression and correlation. No field credit for math majors/minors. PR: MATH 101 or higher. Fall.

MATH 301 Probability & Statistics
Course ID
MATH 301
Credit Hours
3

Mean and standard deviation; probability; random variables and probability distribution; normal distribution, statistical inference; linear regression and correlation; experimental design; chisquare test; analysis of variance. PR: MATH 109 or GNET 116. Spring.

MATH 211 Informal Geometry
Course ID
MATH 211
Credit Hours
3

Theorems are motivated by using experiences with physical objects or pictures and most of them are stated without proof. Point approach is used with space as the set of all points; review elementary
geometry, measurement, observation, intuition and inductive reasoning, distance, coordinate systems, convexitivity, separation, angles, and polygons. No field credit for math majors/minors. PR: MATH 101 or higher. Fall/ODD

MATH 220 Calculus I
Course ID
MATH 220
Credit Hours
4

 A study of elements of plane analytical geometry, including polar coordinates, the derivative of a 
function with applications, integrals and applications, differentiation of transcendental functions, and methods of integration. PR: MATH 109 and MATH 110, or GNET 116, or ACT Mathematics main score of 26 or COMPASS Trigonometry score of 46 or above. Fall, Spring.

BUSN 250 Quantitative Techniques in Business
Course ID
BUSN 250
Credit Hours
3

Theory and application of mathematical models as they are applied to business problem solving. Topics include integrals; quadratic and exponential powers; limits and derivatives; and introductory probability and statistical concepts. This course is not a substitute for any course in the Math calculus sequence. This course will satisfy the Basic Skills mathematics requirement. PR: ACT main math score of 26 (COMPASS 46 or above), or MATH 109; and either ECON 211 or 212. Fall.

MATH 250 Discrete Mathematics
Course ID
MATH 250
Credit Hours
3

 Treats a variety of themes in discrete mathematics: logic and proof, to develop students’ ability to think abstractly; induction and recursion, the use of smaller cases to solve larger cases of problems; combinatorics, mathematics of counting and arranging objects; algorithms and their analysis, the sequence of instructions; discrete structures, e.g., graphs, trees, sets; and mathematical models, applying one theory to many different problems. PR: MATH 109 and MATH 110 or GNET 116. Fall.

MATH 333 Math Methods for K-6 Teachers
Course ID
MATH 333
Credit Hours
3

Instructional methods for teaching K-6 mathematics using a hands-on approach. Emphasis placed on increasing students’ ability to communicate and reason mathematically. Introduces a variety of techniques to approach and solve mathematical problems. PR: MATH 106. Spring.

COSC 330 Programming Languages
Course ID
COSC 330
Credit Hours
3

This class includes specifications of languages (syntax and semantics), data types, data aggregations and abstractions, bindings, control structures, encapsulation, translation, and so on. Programs are planned and developed using accepted professional techniques in various programming languages, for example, Java, C++, Modula-2, ML, Lisp, Prolog, Smalltalk, and so on. PR: COSC 261.

COSC 201 PC Software Applications
Course ID
COSC 201
Credit Hours
3

This course expands the student’s knowledge of microcomputers through the use of various productivity software packages such as word processors, spreadsheets, database management systems, and presentation application software. Projects relating to the individual’s major and hands-on use of the microcomputer are emphasized. CO: GNET 115 or MATH 109.

ARSC 431 Methods of Teaching in Arts & Sciences
Course ID
ARSC 431
Credit Hours
3

Instructional techniques unique to academic subjects in Arts & Sciences. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. CO: EDUC 330. Fall.

*In place of Math 210 Elementary Statistics, you may take Math 301 Probability and Statistics.
*In place of Math 220 Calculus I, you may take BUSN 250 Quant. Tech in Business.
*In place of COSC 330 Programming Languages, you may take COSC 201 PC Software Applications.
Social Studies (Grades 5-9)
HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

HIST 102 World Civilizations II
Course ID
HIST 102
Credit Hours
3

A study of world civilization from the Age of Absolutism to the present with emphasis on the development of global culture. Spring.

HIST 105 American History I
Course ID
HIST 105
Credit Hours
3

Study of the European background, colonial beginnings, the historical, economic, social and political growth of America prior to 1865. Fall.

HIST 106 American History II
Course ID
HIST 106
Credit Hours
3

Study of the historical, political, social, economic and cultural aspects of American
civilization since 1865. Spring.

HIST 302 West Virginia History
Course ID
HIST 302
Credit Hours
3
HIST 497 Research Methods in History
Course ID
HIST 497
Credit Hours
3

A practical seminar in the techniques of historical research, the compilation and evaluation of sources and the writing of history. PR: 6 credits in history. Spring.

GEOG 150 Introduction to Geography
Course ID
GEOG 150
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the study of geography as a social science emphasizing the relevance of geography to human problems, map reading, and place name recognition.

GEOG 301 World Geography
Course ID
GEOG 301
Credit Hours
3
POSC 200 American National Government
Course ID
POSC 200
Credit Hours
3

Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution, governmental structure, the political process and selected policy outcomes. Fall, Spring. 

POSC 405 International Relations
Course ID
POSC 405
Credit Hours
3

Study of major concepts and approaches in world politics and analysis of process, institutions, problems of war and peace and contemporary trends. PR: POSC 200 or POSC 210. Spring.

SOCI 210 Principles of Sociology
Course ID
SOCI 210
Credit Hours
3

Designed to acquaint the student with the scientific method as it is applied to the study of human behavior. A survey of social processes as they relate to culture and society forms the reference framework for the course. Fall, Spring.

ECON 211 Principles of Economics I (Macroeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 211
Credit Hours
3

An introductory analysis of macroeconomics concepts and issues, emphasizing aggregate demand, supply, and fiscal and monetary policies. Analysis of macroeconomic problems related to the American economy. Fall.

ECON 212 Principles of Economics II (Microeconomics)
Course ID
ECON 212
Credit Hours
3

Analysis of consumption and production behavior of household and business organizations. Topics include price and resource allocation and the behavior of firms under different types of market structure. Spring.

ARSC 431 Methods of Teaching in Arts & Sciences
Course ID
ARSC 431
Credit Hours
3

Instructional techniques unique to academic subjects in Arts & Sciences. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. CO: EDUC 330. Fall.

Elementary Education: Recommended Schedule
Semester 1

Fall: Year One

ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

EDUC 110 Foundations of Education
Course ID
EDUC 110
Credit Hours
2

An examination of the historical, sociological and philosophical foundations of education. An introduction to the teaching profession. Students must complete a minimum of 20 hours in a classroom setting. PR: Eligibility for ENGL 101 Fall, Spring.

HIST 101 World Civilizations I
Course ID
HIST 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of civilization from prehistoric man to the Age of Absolutism with emphasis on the development of world culture. Fall.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

ARTS 105 Creative Expressions
Course ID
ARTS 105
Credit Hours
2

An arts and crafts education course that emphasizes the development of a creative arts and crafts program for the needs of the early and middle grade child, with laboratory experience in various media. PR: Eligibility for enrollment in ENGL 101 or permission of the instructor and student’s advisor. Fall.

MATH 101 General Mathematics
Course ID
MATH 101
Credit Hours
3

Study of natural numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, equations, and inequalities; ratio, proportion and variation; graphs; interest; introduction to elementary statistics. Available to students scoring ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Fall, Spring.

*In place of World Civilizations I, you may take World Civilizations II.
*In place of Basic Communication, you may take Fundamentals of Speech.
Semester 2

Spring: Year One

EDUC 160 Diversity & Education
Course ID
EDUC 160
Credit Hours
2

A study of the sociology of ethnicity and the influence on educational needs. Examines effective educational approaches for varied groups. PR: Eligibility for ENGL 101 Fall, Spring.

EDUC 200 Child/Adolescent Growth & Development
Course ID
EDUC 200
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course provides an overview of pre-natal through adolescent development A variety of early childhood programs as well as characteristics and needs of children are discussed. Topics included are principles, stages, and theories of development. A case study is required. PR EDUC 110 and ENG 101. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

HIST 105 American History I
Course ID
HIST 105
Credit Hours
3

Study of the European background, colonial beginnings, the historical, economic, social and political growth of America prior to 1865. Fall.

MATH 109 Algebra
Course ID
MATH 109
Credit Hours
3

Study of real numbers, exponents, roots and radicals; polynomials, first and second-degree equations and inequalities; functions and graphs. Required of students in Math Track A, i.e., students of Radiologic Science, Applied Science, Accountancy, Business Administration, Business Information Systems, or Health Services Management, who have scored an ACT Math score of 19 or higher, a COMPASS Pre-Algebra score of 59 or higher, or an SAT Math score of 460 or higher. Also available to students who have successfully completed MATH 101. Fall, Spring.

Semester 3

Fall: Year Two

SPED 310 Introduction to Special Education
Course ID
SPED 310
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the characteristics of exceptional and diverse learners and their education. The focus is on current issues in special education, laws related to special education, identification of exceptional learners, the referral process, individualized programming, accommodations for inclusion in regular classrooms, and collaboration with other professionals and parents. Students will research current issues and trends related to educating exceptional learners. PR: EDUC 110, 200. Fall and Summer

PHSC 101 Physical Science Survey I
Course ID
PHSC 101
Credit Hours
3

Introductory course for non-science majors containing basic principles of physics (mechanics, electricity, sound and light) and essentials of astronomy (the sun and its family). CO/PR: MATH 101 or equivalent. Fall.

PHSC 103L Laboratory for Physical Science Survey I
Course ID
PHSC 103L
Credit Hours
1

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce PHSC 101 lecture. Sessions consist of observing, reporting and interpreting physical phenomena. CO/PR: PHSC 101. Fall.

HUMN 150 Introduction to Fine Arts
Course ID
HUMN 150
Credit Hours
3

Introduces the student to selected examples of music and the visual arts representing the sociocultural influences and stylistic trends of various periods. The conceptual basis, materials, techniques, and more subtle aspects of creativity will be emphasized. Fall, Spring.

GEOG 150 Introduction to Geography
Course ID
GEOG 150
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the study of geography as a social science emphasizing the relevance of geography to human problems, map reading, and place name recognition.

EDUC 280 General Methods
Course ID
EDUC 280
Credit Hours
2

This course encompasses areas related to classroom instruction and personal learning styles and will prepare students with knowledge, skills, and materials that can be used in a P-12 classroom. Topics include research on effective teaching, lesson planning, thematic units, instructional strategies, classroom management, discipline, cooperative learning, student diversity, and time management. PR: EDUC 110, 200.

Semester 4

Spring: Year Two

After this semester, take the PRAXIS Core Test (5712, 5722 and 5732) and apply for admission to the Teacher Education program.

SPED 311 Teaching Special Needs Students in Inclusive Classrooms
Course ID
SPED 311
Credit Hours
3

Designed for education students who will teach diverse learners and students with special needs in inclusive settings. This course examines instructional methods proven effective in educating students with exceptionalities. Legal definitions, characteristics, prevalence and educational adaptations for each area of exceptionality are stressed. Legal rights of students with exceptionalities and their parents and the responsibilities of educators in addressing those rights are emphasized. PR: EDUC 110, 200, 310.Spring

MUSC 130 Music Skills for Classroom Teachers
Course ID
MUSC 130
Credit Hours
2

The study of music fundamentals and basic skills for classroom teachers. PR: Eligibility for enrollment in ENGL 101. 

PHSC 102 Physical Science Survey II
Course ID
PHSC 102
Credit Hours
3

Introductory course for non-science majors containing elementary modern physics and the basic principles of chemistry, meteorology and earth science. CO/PR: MATH 101 or equivalent. Spring.

PHSC 104L Laboratory for Physical Science Survey II
Course ID
PHSC 104L
Credit Hours
1

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce PHSC 102 lecture. Sessions consist of observing, reporting and interpreting physical phenomena. CO/PR: PHSC 102. Spring.

MATH 106 Math Skills for K-6 Teachers
Course ID
MATH 106
Credit Hours
3
COSC 102 Computers & Society
Course ID
COSC 102
Credit Hours
3

A beginning course introducing the student to the use of computers and requiring no previous computer experience or technical background. The impact of computers on society is briefly discussed, along with an overview of the types, classifications, and functions of various computer hardware, software, and peripherals. The hands-on use of microcomputers is stressed and the ability to use word processing software is emphasized.

Semester 5

Fall: Year Three

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

EDUC 333 Teaching Science & Social Studies
Course ID
EDUC 333
Credit Hours
3

A study and application of current methods of teaching science and social studies content in the public schools. Spring.

ENGL 310 Children's Literature
Course ID
ENGL 310
Credit Hours
3

The selection, analysis, evaluation, and presentation of world literatures for children and adolescents, methods for using these materials in the classroom, appreciation for the depth and variety of such literatures, and exploration of the issues related to these texts. PR: ENGL 201 or 205. Fall.

HLTH 333 Health & Safety in Schools
Course ID
HLTH 333
Credit Hours
2

The elements of comprehensive school health programs are presented. Emphasis is placed on how teachers can maintain a healthy school environment. An overview of acute and chronic health problems of children is discussed. Candidates present health-related lessons in an elementary school. CPR and first aid are discussed as they relate and impact the school environment. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. Fall.

PHED 333 P.E. in K-6 Grades
Course ID
PHED 333
Credit Hours
2

Emphasizes concepts, principles, materials and activities that should be incorporated in a physical education program in the early and middle grades. Required of all early and middle grade education students and includes field experiences in a public school setting. PR: Admission to Teacher Education.

HIST 102 World Civilizations II
Course ID
HIST 102
Credit Hours
3

A study of world civilization from the Age of Absolutism to the present with emphasis on the development of global culture. Spring.

*In place of ENGL 201 World Literature I, you may take ENGL 205 World Literature II.
Semester 6

Spring: Year Three

EDUC 322 Standards, Planning & Assessment
Course ID
EDUC 322
Credit Hours
2

Examines the interrelationships among content standards, instructional objectives, planning and assessment. Students will design instructional units based on standards, and will examine a variety of evaluation techniques, including standardized tests, teacher-made tests and authentic performance assessments. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. Summer, Spring.

READ 270 The Reading Process
Course ID
READ 270
Credit Hours
3

Attention will be given to reading skills and concepts and current practices in reading instruction in the early–middle grades. This course is required as the first course in the reading sequence. Students must complete 10 additional hours of clinical experience in a public school setting. PR: EDUC 200. Spring

ENGL 301 English Grammar
Course ID
ENGL 301
Credit Hours
3

A comprehensive course comprising the major rules of Standard American English (SAE) usage, sentence structure, mechanics, and conventions. Includes pedagogical approaches to teaching grammar. PR: ENGL 101, ENGL 102. Fall, Spring.

MATH 333 Math Methods for K-6 Teachers
Course ID
MATH 333
Credit Hours
3

Instructional methods for teaching K-6 mathematics using a hands-on approach. Emphasis placed on increasing students’ ability to communicate and reason mathematically. Introduces a variety of techniques to approach and solve mathematical problems. PR: MATH 106. Spring.

BIOL 102 General Biology II
Course ID
BIOL 102
Credit Hours
3

An introductory course concerned with heredity gene function, evolution, human anatomy and physiology, and animal diversity. PR: Eligibility to enroll in ENGL 101. Spring.

BIOL 104L General Biology II Lab
Course ID
BIOL 104L
Credit Hours
1

Laboratory sessions designed to reinforce lecture in BIOL 102. CO/PR: BIOL 102. Spring.

*EDUC 322 Standards, Planning & Assessment denotes admission to the Teacher Education program.
Semester 7

Fall: Year Four (Mini Block)

HIST 302 History, Geography & Government of West Virginia
Course ID
HIST 302
Credit Hours
3

A survey course on the history, economy, and political life of West Virginia with a cursory consideration of its geographic background. PR: HIST 105 or 106. Fall.

READ 360 Reading in the Content Area
Course ID
READ 360
Credit Hours
3

This course addresses issues and challenges related to teaching language and content to students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Implementation and evaluation of reading interventions for struggling readers, including improving overall level of reading achievement through building vocabulary, literal understanding, inferential reading and creative content application to increase comprehension retention, are covered. PR: Admission to Teacher Education. Fall and Summer

EDUC 330 Theories of Learning & Classroom Management
Course ID
EDUC 330
Credit Hours
3

Overview of current research and theories of learning and classroom management. Topics include behavior and classroom management techniques including the physical environment, motivation, routines, time-management and self-regulation. In the clinical portion of the class, students spend 64 hours as a supervised tutor in a school setting. Fall.

READ 371 Teaching of Reading and Language Arts
Course ID
READ 371
Credit Hours
3

Classroom strategies for reading, listening, speaking, handwriting, spelling and grammar. PR: READ 270 and admission to Teacher Education. CO: EDUC 330. Fall and Spring

EDUC 321 Instruction & Technology
Course ID
EDUC 321
Credit Hours
2

Provides candidates with the knowledge and skills to apply technology to teaching, learning, and curriculum. Objectives are based on ISTE Standards and 21st Century Learning Skills. Summer, Fall.

POSC 200 American National Government
Course ID
POSC 200
Credit Hours
3

Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution,governmental structure, the political process and selected policy outcomes Fall, Spring

*READ 360, EDUC 330 and READ 371 denote admission to the Teacher Education program.
Semester 8

Spring: Year Four (Professional Semester)

EDUC 474 Senior Seminar
Course ID
EDUC 474
Credit Hours
2

The purpose of the Senior Seminar is to help candidates continue to understand the teaching and learning process as well as demonstrating skills and abilities as a teacher. The seminar is two-fold: completion of an Action Research Project and a Senior Portfolio. Grade of C or better for successful completion. PR: Admission to the Professional Semester. Fall and Spring.

EDUC 475 Student Teaching
Course ID
EDUC 475
Credit Hours
10

Student will be assigned to a school for a full day of teaching for a minimum of 15 weeks. Student teaching is completed at the developmental levels and in the content areas for which the student expects to be certified. PR: Admission to Professional Semester. Fall and Spring

*Both EDUC 474 and EDUC 475 denote admission to the Teacher Education program.

The Professional Semester

Teaching becomes tangible during your last semester, called the professional semester, when coursework focuses on teaching methodology and classroom management. The semester concludes with 14 weeks of full-time student teaching.

Bluefield State’s placement coordinator works with students, either at one of the local partner schools or through a school near where they live to schedule their placements. Students typically choose two placements (K-2, 3-5 and/or middle school) depending on their focus.

To apply to the professional semester, you will need to complete the following.

  1. Complete a minimum of 96 program hours with an overall GPA of 2.75 or higher. This needs to include 100, 200 and 300-level Professional Education courses, as well as your specialization courses.
  2. Submit an application to the director of Teacher Education early in the semester prior to the one in which you’ll be doing your student teaching. You can obtain an application from a faculty member or from the Teacher Education Handbook.
  3. Participate in an interview with faculty to review your status and plan for your placement before you register for the professional semester.

Student Teaching Portfolio

Once you've completed your student teaching, you'll be responsible for compiling a portfolio that includes student teaching evaluations, lesson plans, case studies and research papers from throughout your coursework; a video offering a self-analysis; and other materials. Your professors will guide you in compiling the portfolio, and the full list of components is available in the handbook.

Praxis Subject Assessments

Designed for students preparing to enter the teaching profession, the Praxis Subject Assessments test your knowledge of teaching skills and basic subjects. In order to graduate, you’ll need to take the following Praxis exams: Elementary Education: Multiple Subjects (5001) Elementary Education Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment; and Principles of Learning and Teaching (5622)—and, if you have a middle school focus, Middle School English/Language Arts, Middle School Science, Middle School Social Studies or Middle School Mathematics (depending on your specialization).

Students are responsible for paying for the tests. You can register for your exam here.

To view a full list of current tests required for all licensure areas in West Virginia, please click here.

Teacher Certification

During your final semester, the director of Teacher Education will work with you to submit the necessary paperwork to the WV Department of Education so you can seek your certification and begin teaching. Students who want to seek certification in other states can consult the director.