B.S. in Electrical Engineering Technology

Preparing students for effective careers in electrical engineering, this program covers the design and operational characteristics of electrical circuits, electrical machinery and electronics equipment.

Bachelor's-level studies pave the way for jobs in electrical engineering design, as well as pursuing advanced degrees.

At a Glance
123 credit hours
8 semesters
3 electives
How to Apply

There are no special requirements to apply. In order to enroll in the program, all you need to do is select Electrical Engineering Technology as your major when you apply to Bluefield State College.

How to Earn Your Degree

Your advisor will work with you throughout your academic journey to make sure you're on track to earn your degree. Receiving the B.S. in Electrical Engineering Technology requires completing the following courses:

Semester 1
ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

GNET 102 Technical Physics II
Course ID
GNET 102
Credit Hours
4

A study of the basic concepts of electricity and the application of these concepts to fundamental direct and alternating current circuits. The principles of electromagnetism and electrostatics are also studied and applied to problems involving the production and utilization of electric energy. PR: ACT score in mathematics of 19 or above, or GNET 098. Spring.

GNET 115 Technical Mathematics I
Course ID
GNET 115
Credit Hours
4

A study of fundamental algebraic concepts and operations, functions and graphs, trigonometric functions and their graphs, linear equations and determinants, factoring, fractions, vectors, and triangles. PR: ACT score in mathematics of 19 or above, or GNET 098. Fall.

Elective
Credit Hours
3
Semester 2
ELET 110 Circuit Analysis I
Course ID
ELET 110
Credit Hours
4

A study of the concepts of complex circuit analysis for both direct and alternating current circuits. Topics studied include network theorems, sinusoidal alternating waveforms with basic elements and phases. ELET 112L is the lab component for the course and should be taken simultaneously with ELET 110.CO: ELET 112, GNET 116. PR GNET 102. Spring.

ELET 112L Electrical Measurements
Course ID
ELET 112L
Credit Hours
1

Stresses the practical application of circuit theory presented in ELET 110. The design characteristics of electrical measuring devices including tools, meters and oscilloscopes are discussed and the proper use of these devices in various types of circuits is emphasized. PR: GNET 102, CO: ELET 110. Spring.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

GNET 101 Technical Physics I
Course ID
GNET 101
Credit Hours
4

A study of mechanics and heat. Topics discussed include vectors, concurrent and nonconcurrent forces, kinematics and linear motion, work, energy, simple machines, impulse, momentum, thermal expansion, specific heat, and change of state. PR: ACT score in mathematics of 19 or above, or GNET 098 or COMPASS Engineering Math score of 59 or higher. Fall.

GNET 116 Technical Mathematics II
Course ID
GNET 116
Credit Hours
4

A study of exponents and radicals, complex numbers, logarithms, systems of equations, theory of equations, inequalities, determinants, matrices, variations, progressions, properties of trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric functions. PR: GNET 115. Spring.

Semester 3
ELET 201 Solid State Electronics
Course ID
ELET 201
Credit Hours
4

A study of solid-state electronics. The design and construction of semiconductor devices is discussed. Devices studied include germanium and silicon diodes, zener diodes, rectifiers and junction transistors. PR: ELET 110, ELET 112. Fall.

ELET 205 AC/DC Machinery
Course ID
ELET 205
Credit Hours
4

A study of the physical and operational characteristics of direct current motors and generators; stepper motors; transformers; single-phase and polyphase induction motors. Introduction and applications of variable frequency drives will be presented. Laboratory experiments are used to demonstrate the behavior of the devices under various operating conditions. PR: ELET 110, ELET 112. Fall.

ELET 209 Power Systems
Course ID
ELET 209
Credit Hours
3

Fundamentals and procedures in transmission and distribution of electrical energy along with introduction to principles of operations and applications of various electrical protection devices. Selection of proper protective devices and coordination of an electrical system will be examined. PR: ELET 110. Fall.

MATH 220 Calculus I
Course ID
MATH 220
Credit Hours
4

 A study of elements of plane analytical geometry, including polar coordinates, the derivative of a 
function with applications, integrals and applications, differentiation of transcendental functions, and methods of integration. PR: MATH 109 and MATH 110, or GNET 116, or ACT Mathematics main score of 26 or COMPASS Trigonometry score of 46 or above. Fall, Spring.

COSC 210 Visual Basic
Course ID
COSC 210
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the Visual BASIC event-driven programming language with emphasis on producing working programs. Includes how to design a Windows-interface, how to set the properties of objects on the interface/form, and how to code, debug, execute and document the actions/behaviors of selected objects. Also includes the coding of structured algorithms to do branching and looping along with other problem solving techniques and the development of an acceptable programming style. PR: GNET 115, MATH 109, or written consent of the instructor.

Semester 4
ELET 202 Semiconductor Devices & Circuits
Course ID
ELET 202
Credit Hours
4

A follow up of solid-state electronics. The course focuses on further study of semiconductor devices and their applications. Study includes bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors, thyristors and simple small-scale integrated circuits. PR: ELET 201. Spring.

ELET 216 Electrical Control Systems
Course ID
ELET 216
Credit Hours
4

A study of direct and alternating current systems for controlling operation of electric motors. Electromagnetic and static control systems are studied in detail. An introduction to the operations of a programmable controller will be included with both ladder logic. PR: ELET 205. Spring.

ELET 218 Fundamentals of Computers
Course ID
ELET 218
Credit Hours
4

A study of the electronic construction and operation of digital computers, integrated components and elements electronically interconnected for obtaining basic digital computer performance, including an introduction to microprocessors. Individual components and elements are analyzed using Boolean algebra and Karnaugh mapping to insure the most simple and most economical networks. Some basic networks studied are exclusive OR, half adders, full adders, shift registers, comparators, counters, arithmetic, memory units and microprocessors. PR: GNET 116. Spring.

MEET 112 Computer Aided Drafting
Course ID
MEET 112
Credit Hours
3

General introduction to the principles of computer aided drafting including the study of CAD system components, entity creation, and methods of editing and manipulation, with the major emphasis placed on hands-on practice in the CAD laboratory. Spring.

Semester 5
ELET 305 Microprocessors
Course ID
ELET 305
Credit Hours
4

Microprocessors are studied as elements in bus organized computers. Applications for controlling outside devices are studied. Flow charts are used to demonstrate how control decisions can be based on programmed, priority, or interrupt demands. Support devices are studied of which a few are: read only memories (ROM), random access memories (RAM), arithmetic logic units (ALU), accumulators, and Input/output (I/O) devices. PR: ELET 218. Fall.

ELET 307 Circuit Analysis II
Course ID
ELET 307
Credit Hours
3

Develops nodal and loop analysis. Circuits are studied using these techniques to solve more difficult problems. Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems are rigorously studied. PSpice is introduced and used to solve complex circuits. Simple RC and RL circuits are also studied. PR: ELET 110, MATH 220. Fall.

MATH 230 Calculus II
Course ID
MATH 230
Credit Hours
4

Differentiation of transcendental functions; parametric equation; polar coordinates; methods of
integration; applications of the definite integral. Infinte Series. PR: MATH 220. Fall, Spring.

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

*ENGL 201: Instead of ENGL 201, you may also take ENGL 205 (World Literature II).
*COMM 201: Instead of COMM 201, you may also take COMM 208 (Fundamentals of Speech).
Semester 6
ELET 304 Integrated Circuit Technology
Course ID
ELET 304
Credit Hours
4

A study of medium and large scale integrated circuits and their applications. Special circuits using LCD, SCR, UJT, TRIAC and DIAC are studied. PR: ELET 202. Spring.

ELET 316 Programmable Controllers
Course ID
ELET 316
Credit Hours
3 credits

Principles and applications of programmable controllers with introduction to basic components of the system and ladder logic programming; assignments will include work on industrial-type programmable controllers and software packages using a computer interfaced with a controller. PR: ELET 216 or consent of instructor. Spring.

MATH 310 Differential Equations
Course ID
MATH 310
Credit Hours
3

Equations of order one; linear differential equations; nonhomogeneous equations; variation of parameters; differential operations; Laplace transformation; nonlinear equations; power series methods; applications. PR: MATH 230. Spring.

ENGR 315 Engineering Economics
Course ID
ENGR 315
Credit Hours
3

The study of the relative economy of engineering alternatives, compound interest in relation to calculation of annual costs, present worth and prospective rates of returns on investments, methods of depreciation, sinking cost, increment cost, general studies with emphasis on retirement and replacement of equipment, consideration of taxes, public works, and manufacturing costs as related to economic solutions of engineering proposals. Principles of engineering ethics are presented and related to costing. PR: MATH 220. Fall.

EGMT 317 Project Management
Course ID
EGMT 317
Credit Hours
3

A study of the fundamental terminology, skills, tools, and techniques applied to manage project activities in order to exceed client expectations for an engineering or computer science project. Coursework will include an introduction to the context of project management processes, team development, problem solving, scheduling & time management, cost control, quality monitoring & evaluation, documentation & communication, risk management, and continuous improvement. PR: COSC Prefix course, Junior Standing. Fall

Semester 7
CHEM 101 General Chemistry I
Course ID
CHEM 101
Credit Hours
3

A presentation of the principles of chemistry through a study of the structure and reactions of representative elements and compounds. Principles covered include stoichiometry, thermochemistry, chemical bonding, and the gaseous state. CO/PR: MATH 109 or GNET 115. Fall

CHEM 103L General Chemistry I Lab
Course ID
CHEM 103L
Credit Hours
1

Sessions consist of observing, reporting, and interpreting chemical phenomena. CO/PR: CHEM 101. Fall.

ENGR 201 Statics
Course ID
ENGR 201
Credit Hours
3

Vector mechanics course covering concepts of forces, moments, couples, and resultants; equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; forces in trusses, frames and machines; centroids and centers of mass for lines, areas, and volumes; distributed loads, internal shear-force and bending-moment calculations for beams; dry friction and belt friction; area moments of inertia and the parallel-axis theorem. PR: GNET 101, GNET 116. Fall.

ELET 290 Topics in Electrical Engineering Technology
Course ID
ELET 290
Credit Hours
3

A formal course in diverse areas of Electrical Engineering Technology. Course may be repeated for different topics. Specific topics will be announced and indicated by subtitle on transcript. PR: Consent of instructor.

Elective
Credit Hours
3
Semester 8
ELET 401 Advanced Circuits Analysis
Course ID
ELET 401
Credit Hours
3
ELET 408 Communication Electronics
Course ID
ELET 408
Credit Hours
4

Students are introduced to coupling networks, response analysis and noise. AM and FM transmission and reception, and related circuits are studied along with an introduction to transmission lines, antennas, and microwave circuits. PR: ELET 202, MATH 220. Spring.

ELET 492 Senior Project
Course ID
ELET 492
Credit Hours
3

Students will perform a hands-on project, with prior approval of the faculty, requiring comprehensive understanding of the electrical engineering technology. This project can be done at the college facilities or at the area industries. The end product resulting from this project should be submitted to the advisor along with a small thesis-type report. The student will be required to make an oral presentation in front of a committee comprising all the faculty of the department.

Elective
Credit Hours
3
Core Skills Health & Wellness
Course ID
Core Skills
Credit Hours
2

Special Exams

After receiving your B.S. in Electrical Engineering Technology degree, you may visit the West Virginia Board of Registration for Professional Engineers to take the required exam and meet any service requirements in order to be registered as a professional engineer.

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Graduates continue education through the completion of study in a masters or PhD program.
  2. Graduates receive professional certification such as Professional Engineer (PE) license.
  3. Graduates manage technical activities in support of Electrical engineering infrastructure.

Student Outcomes

  1. Students demonstrate an ability to select and apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to broadly defined electrical engineering technology activities.
  2. Students demonstrate an ability to select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to electrical engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies.
  3. Students demonstrate an ability to conduct standard tests and measurements; to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments; and to apply experimental results to improve processes.
  4. Students demonstrate an ability to design systems, components, or processes for broadly defined electrical engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives.
  5. Students demonstrate an ability to function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team.
  6. Students demonstrate an ability to identify, analyze, and solve broadly defined electrical engineering technology problems.
  7. Students demonstrate an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature.
  8. Students demonstrate an understanding of the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development.
  9. Students demonstrate an understanding of, and a commitment to address, professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity.
  10. Students demonstrate a knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context.
  11. Students demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.
  12. Students demonstrate the ability to analyze, design, and implement control systems, instrumentation systems, communications systems, computer systems, or power systems.
  13. Students demonstrate the ability to apply project management techniques to electrical/electronic(s) systems.
  14. Students demonstrate the ability to utilize statistics/probability, transform methods, discrete mathematics, or applied differential equations in support of electrical/electronic(s) systems.

Number of Graduates

  • 2016 - 13
  • 2015 - 4
  • 2014 - 10
  • 2013 - 3
  • 2012 - 9