B.S. in Engineering Management

Through a curriculum that blends engineering and management studies, this program will prepare you for leadership positions in technology-based companies.

You will learn to apply the problem-solving savvy of engineering principles to business practices.

At a Glance
120 credit hours
8 semesters
Builds on an A.S. in Engineering degree
How to Apply

Only graduates of an A.S. in Engineering Management program—or an associate’s degree in a technical field approved by the dean—are eligible to apply. In order to qualify, the degree needs to:

  1. Meet all BSC general studies requirements for an associate’s degree.

  2. Encompass at least 60 credit hours.

  3. Include successful completion of at least one calculus, one statistics, and one Computer Aided Drafting course.

In order to apply for the B.S. in Engineering Management, all you need to do is select the Engineering Management major when you apply to Bluefield State College.

How to Earn Your Degree

Your advisor will work with you throughout your academic journey to make sure you're on track to earn your degree. Receiving the B.S. in Engineering Management requires completing the following courses:

Required Coursework

In semesters one through four, you will complete the A.S. degree in Engineering Technology or an A.S. degree in a technical field approved by the dean of the School of Engineering Technology and Computer Science.

The degree must contain at least 60 hours and meet all Bluefield State College general studies requirements for an associate degree and include successful completion of at least one calculus, one statistics, and one Computer Aided Drafting course.

Then, complete the following courses in semesters five through eight.

Semester 5
ENGR 315 Engineering Economics
Course ID
ENGR 315
Credit Hours
3

The study of the relative economy of engineering alternatives, compound interest in relation to calculation of annual costs, present worth and prospective rates of returns on investments, methods of depreciation, sinking cost, increment cost, general studies with emphasis on retirement and replacement of equipment, consideration of taxes, public works, and manufacturing costs as related to economic solutions of engineering proposals. Principles of engineering ethics are presented and related to costing. PR: MATH 220. Fall.

EGMT 323 Technology Entrepreneurship
Course ID
EGMT 323
Credit Hours
3

This course introduces and examines the fundamentals of technology entrepreneurship, through instructor-guided individual and team projects, in-depth case studies, and research on the entrepreneurial process. Entrepreneurship is a business leadership approach that encourages individuals to confront problems by seeking business opportunities through technological solutions. Entrepreneurship in technology involves identifying high potential, commercial opportunities, gathering talent and capital, and managing rapid development, growth and significant risks using principled decision-making skills. This course is designed to be valuable for undergraduate students who seek to understand the innovation and the entrepreneurial process. PR: Math 220, Junior Standing. Fall.

COSC 210 Visual Basic
Course ID
COSC 210
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the Visual BASIC event-driven programming language with emphasis on producing working programs. Includes how to design a Windows-interface, how to set the properties of objects on the interface/form, and how to code, debug, execute and document the actions/behaviors of selected objects. Also includes the coding of structured algorithms to do branching and looping along with other problem solving techniques and the development of an acceptable programming style. PR: GNET 115, MATH 109, or written consent of the instructor.

MGMT 210 Principles of Management
Course ID
MGMT 210
Credit Hours
3

An analysis of the underlying theories and principles of planning, organizing,
influencing, and controlling. Topics for special emphasis include corporate social responsibility, diversity, and managing in the global arena. Fall. 

ENGL 201 World Literature I
Course ID
ENGL 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of representative works of world literature from antiquity to 1750. The course emphasizes the study and consideration of the literary, cultural, and human significance of selected great works of the Western and non-Western literary traditions. This course gives special attention to critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity. PR: A grade of C or higher in ENGL 102. HIST 101 is recommended. Fall, Spring.

*A technical elective may be taken (MATH 220, MATH 301, MEET 112 if needed) in place of COSC 210 Visual Basic.
*In place of ENGL 201 World Literature I, you may take ENGL 205 World Literature II.
Semester 6
EGMT 317 Project Management
Course ID
EGMT 317
Credit Hours
3

A study of the fundamental terminology, skills, tools, and techniques applied to manage project activities in order to exceed client expectations for an engineering or computer science project. Coursework will include an introduction to the context of project management processes, team development, problem solving, scheduling & time management, cost control, quality monitoring & evaluation, documentation & communication, risk management, and continuous improvement. PR: COSC Prefix course, Junior Standing. Fall.

EGMT 362 Discrete Event Simulation
Course ID
EGMT 362
Credit Hours
3

Introduces fundamentals of modeling and simulating discrete-state, event-driven systems. Includes basic simulation concepts and terms, queuing theory models for discrete event systems, structure of discrete event simulations, problem formulation and specification, input data representation, output data analysis, verification and validation, and the design of simulation experiments. PR: ENGR 311; CO: COSC201. Spring.

COMM 201 Basic Communication
Course ID
COMM 201
Credit Hours
3

This introductory course in human communication develops communication competence by exploring the foundations of communication, interpersonal communication, group communication and public speaking. Emphasis is on developing practical skills in the following areas: critical thinking, research, listening, language, nonverbal, ethics, conflict management and resolution, self-confidence, perception, relationships, teamwork, interviewing, public speaking, and diversity. PR: ENGL 102 and Computer Literacy course. Fall, Spring.

MGMT 330 Organizational Behavior
Course ID
MGMT 330
Credit Hours
3

A study of individual and group behavior and organizational processes within the total organization. Major topics covered include learning, perception, attitudes, job satisfaction, personalities, stress, motivation, group formation and processes, leadership, communication, conflict, and organizational change and development. PR: MGMT 210 or permission of instructor. Fall.

Elective
Credit Hours
3
*In place of COMM 201 Basic Communication, you may take COMM 208 Fundamentals of Speech.
Semester 7
EGMT 443 Statistical Process Control
Course ID
EGMT 443
Credit Hours
3

Introduces fundamentals of process improvement tool and SPC. Includes basic probability and fundamental statistical concepts used in industrial process control charting. Topics include data collection techniques, descriptive analysis, control charts for variables data, control charts for attributes and process capability measures. CO: ENGR 311. Spring.

EGMT 463 System Dynamics Control
Course ID
EGMT 463
Credit Hours
3

Introduces system dynamics concepts including structure and behavior of dynamic systems, causal loop diagrams, stocks and flows, path dependence and positive feedback, delays, sensitivity analysis and verification and validation of models. PR: MATH 220. Fall.

EGMT 401 Business Planning for Engineers
Course ID
EGMT 401
Credit Hours
3

This course emphasizes strategic planning and implementation for technology businesses. The highly interactive, live business-planning course integrates content from foundational courses such as engineering economics, operations management, project management with the development of analytical, communication, and teamwork skills. Students demonstrate their capacity to develop and execute organizational strategies in actual or simulated business situations. The course is designed for undergraduate engineering students to actively engage in business modeling for development of a product or technology to commercialize. Business planning concepts will be presented as a cohesive transformational process for technology students and future entrepreneurs to yield a document (business plan) that will suitable for entry in organized business plan competitions, obtaining external financing for a technology venture and serve as a valuable internal guide. PR: EGMT 324. Fall.

Elective
Credit Hours
3
Elective
Credit Hours
3
*One of the electives must be a technical elective.
Semester 8
EGMT 410 Operations Research
Course ID
EGMT 410
Credit Hours
3

Introduces operation research concepts including model formulation, graphical analysis, linear programming, the simplex method, sensitivity analysis network flow models, nonlinear programming and integer programming as a means to optimize industrial processes. PR: MATH 220. Spring.

EGMT 413 Undergraduate Research
Course ID
EGMT 413
Credit Hours
3

This course is intended to guide undergraduate students from School of Engineering Technology programs through the stages of writing a proposal for their research project and subsequent portfolio report, poster, or thesis. Topics include planning, research and documentation, writing technique and editing, document design, ethics, abstracts, presentation of the proposal, internship, assistantships and interdisciplinary perspectives. PR: EGMT 317, MATH 220, senior standing. Fall.

EGMT 472 Facilities Planning
Course ID
EGMT 472
Credit Hours
3

Introduces facilities concepts including product design, process design, schedule design, machine requirement planning, space and activity relationships, product, process and cellular layout, material handling systems, computer aided facilities layout and single and multiple facility location problems. PR: ENGR 315, EGMT 323. Spring.

MGMT 482 Collective Bargaining & Labor Relations
Course ID
MGMT 482
Credit Hours
3

An examination of the theory and practice of collective bargaining. Topics include historical, social, and economic environments for labor-management relations, labor law, contract negotiation, contract topics and topical patterns, conflict resolution, grievance administration, and arbitration. PR: MGMT 210 and Junior Standing. Fall.

Core Skills Health & Wellness
Course ID
Core Skills
Credit Hours
2
*You may substitute EGMT 413 Undergraduate Research with a senior-level projects course if you are a double major.
*You may substitute EGMT 472 Facilities Planning with ARET 306 Site Planning.

Special Exams

After receiving your B.S. in Engineering Management degree, you may visit the West Virginia Board of Registration for Professional Engineers to take the required exam and meet any service requirements in order to be registered as a professional engineer.

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Graduates apply operational research, engineering economic, quality control and management principles to analyze, evaluate, improve and implement for engineering management projects.
  2. Graduates function on professional teams and communicate with speaking, writing, and graphical skills.
  3. Graduates respect professional, ethical, and social issues as well as a commitment to quality and dependability.
  4. Graduates remain current, professionally.
  5. To provide breadth for additional job opportunities, graduates utilize rigorous mathematics techniques, computer programming and simulation software in support of complex engineering management projects.
  6. Graduates apply project management techniques to manage product design and development.

The Engineering Management program publishes the following program outcomes to describe what students are expected to know and do at the time of graduation. These relate to knowledge, skills, and behaviors that students acquire in the program. These outcomes are defined as requirements from the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET.

Student Outcomes

  1. Students demonstrate an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. Students demonstrate an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  3. Students demonstrate an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  4. Students demonstrate an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  5. Students demonstrate an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. Students demonstrate an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  7. Students demonstrate an ability to communicate effectively.
  8. Students possess the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  9. Students have recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  10. Students possess knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. Students demonstrate an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
  12. Students possess an ability to understand the engineering relationships between the management tasks of planning, organization, leadership, control, and the human element in production, research, and service organizations.
  13. Students possess an ability to understand and deal with the stochastic nature of management systems.
  14. Students possess an ability to integrate management systems into a series of different technological environments.