A.S. in Electrical Engineering Technology

Baccalaureate Track

Preparing students for effective careers in electrical engineering, this program covers the design and operational characteristics of electrical circuits, electrical machinery and electronics equipment.

You will gain the marketable skills needed to pursue jobs at the technician level.

At a Glance
63 credit hours
4 semesters
1 elective
How to Apply

There are no special requirements to apply. In order to enroll in the program, all you need to do is select Electrical Engineering Technology as your major when you apply to Bluefield State College.

How to Earn Your Degree

Your advisor will work with you throughout your academic journey to make sure you're on track to earn your degree. Receiving the A.S. in Electrical Engineering Technology requires completing the following courses:

Semester 1
ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

GNET 102 Technical Physics II
Course ID
GNET 102
Credit Hours
4

A study of the basic concepts of electricity and the application of these concepts to fundamental direct and alternating current circuits. The principles of electromagnetism and electrostatics are also studied and applied to problems involving the production and utilization of electric energy. PR: ACT score in mathematics of 19 or above, or GNET 098. Spring.

GNET 115 Technical Mathematics I
Course ID
GNET 115
Credit Hours
4

A study of fundamental algebraic concepts and operations, functions and graphs, trigonometric functions and their graphs, linear equations and determinants, factoring, fractions, vectors, and triangles. PR: ACT score in mathematics of 19 or above, or GNET 098. Fall.

Core Skills FA/H/SS Core Skills
Course ID
Core Skills
Credit Hours
3
Semester 2
ELET 110 Circuit Analysis I
Course ID
ELET 110
Credit Hours
4

A study of the concepts of complex circuit analysis for both direct and alternating current circuits. Topics studied include network theorems, sinusoidal alternating waveforms with basic elements and phases. ELET 112L is the lab component for the course and should be taken simultaneously with ELET 110.CO: ELET 112, GNET 116. PR GNET 102. Spring.

ELET 112L Electrical Measurements
Course ID
ELET 112L
Credit Hours
1

Stresses the practical application of circuit theory presented in ELET 110. The design characteristics of electrical measuring devices including tools, meters and oscilloscopes are discussed and the proper use of these devices in various types of circuits is emphasized. PR: GNET 102, CO: ELET 110. Spring.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

GNET 101 Technical Physics I
Course ID
GNET 101
Credit Hours
4

A study of mechanics and heat. Topics discussed include vectors, concurrent and nonconcurrent forces, kinematics and linear motion, work, energy, simple machines, impulse, momentum, thermal expansion, specific heat, and change of state. PR: ACT score in mathematics of 19 or above, or GNET 098 or COMPASS Engineering Math score of 59 or higher. Fall.

GNET 116 Technical Mathematics II
Course ID
GNET 116
Credit Hours
4

A study of exponents and radicals, complex numbers, logarithms, systems of equations, theory of equations, inequalities, determinants, matrices, variations, progressions, properties of trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric functions. PR: GNET 115. Spring.

Semester 3
ELET 201 Solid State Electronics
Course ID
ELET 201
Credit Hours
4

A study of solid-state electronics. The design and construction of semiconductor devices is discussed. Devices studied include germanium and silicon diodes, zener diodes, rectifiers and junction transistors. PR: ELET 110, ELET 112. Fall.

ELET 205 AC/DC Machinery
Course ID
ELET 205
Credit Hours
4

A study of the physical and operational characteristics of direct current motors and generators; stepper motors; transformers; single-phase and polyphase induction motors. Introduction and applications of variable frequency drives will be presented. Laboratory experiments are used to demonstrate the behavior of the devices under various operating conditions. PR: ELET 110, ELET 112. Fall.

ELET 209 Power Systems
Course ID
ELET 209
Credit Hours
3

Fundamentals and procedures in transmission and distribution of electrical energy along with introduction to principles of operations and applications of various electrical protection devices. Selection of proper protective devices and coordination of an electrical system will be examined. PR: ELET 110. Fall.

MATH 220 Calculus I
Course ID
MATH 220
Credit Hours
4

 A study of elements of plane analytical geometry, including polar coordinates, the derivative of a 
function with applications, integrals and applications, differentiation of transcendental functions, and methods of integration. PR: MATH 109 and MATH 110, or GNET 116, or ACT Mathematics main score of 26 or COMPASS Trigonometry score of 46 or above. Fall, Spring.

COSC 210 Visual Basic
Course ID
COSC 210
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the Visual BASIC event-driven programming language with emphasis on producing working programs. Includes how to design a Windows-interface, how to set the properties of objects on the interface/form, and how to code, debug, execute and document the actions/behaviors of selected objects. Also includes the coding of structured algorithms to do branching and looping along with other problem solving techniques and the development of an acceptable programming style. PR: GNET 115, MATH 109, or written consent of the instructor.

Semester 4
ELET 202 Semiconductor Devices & Circuits
Course ID
ELET 202
Credit Hours
4

A follow up of solid-state electronics. The course focuses on further study of semiconductor devices and their applications. Study includes bipolar junction transistors, field effect transistors, thyristors and simple small-scale integrated circuits. PR: ELET 201. Spring.

ELET 216 Electrical Control Systems
Course ID
ELET 216
Credit Hours
4

A study of direct and alternating current systems for controlling operation of electric motors. Electromagnetic and static control systems are studied in detail. An introduction to the operations of a programmable controller will be included with both ladder logic. PR: ELET 205. Spring.

ELET 218 Fundamentals of Computers
Course ID
ELET 218
Credit Hours
4

A study of the electronic construction and operation of digital computers, integrated components and elements electronically interconnected for obtaining basic digital computer performance, including an introduction to microprocessors. Individual components and elements are analyzed using Boolean algebra and Karnaugh mapping to insure the most simple and most economical networks. Some basic networks studied are exclusive OR, half adders, full adders, shift registers, comparators, counters, arithmetic, memory units and microprocessors. PR: GNET 116. Spring.

MEET 112 Computer Aided Drafting
Course ID
MEET 112
Credit Hours
3

General introduction to the principles of computer aided drafting including the study of CAD system components, entity creation, and methods of editing and manipulation, with the major emphasis placed on hands-on practice in the CAD laboratory. Spring.

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Graduates make significant contributions to the engineering technology profession, to their employers and communities.
  2. Graduates function on professional teams and communicate with speaking, writing, and graphical skills.
  3. Graduates respect professional, ethical, and social issues as well as a commitment to quality and dependability.
  4. Graduates remain current professionally through the attendance of training, seminars, conferences, etc.

Student Outcomes

  1. Students demonstrate an ability to apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, and modern tools of the discipline to narrowly defined electrical engineering technology activities.
  2. Students demonstrate an ability to apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require limited application of principles but extensive practical knowledge.
  3. Students demonstrate an ability to conduct standard tests and measurements, and to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments.
  4. Students demonstrate an ability to function effectively as a member of a technical team.
  5. Students demonstrate an ability to identify, analyze, and solve narrowly defined electrical engineering technology problems.
  6. Students demonstrate an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature.
  7. Students demonstrate an understanding of the need for and an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development.
  8. Students demonstrate an understanding of and a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities, including a respect for diversity.
  9. Students demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.
  10. Students demonstrate knowledge in the application of circuit analysis and design, computer programming, associated software, analog and digital electronics and microcomputers, and engineering standards to the building, testing, operation, and maintenance of electrical/electronic(s) systems.
  11. Students demonstrate knowledge in the applications of physics or chemistry to electrical/electronic(s) circuits in a rigorous mathematical environment at or above the level of algebra and trigonometry.

Number of Graduates 

  • 2016 - 13
  • 2015 - 4
  • 2014 - 10
  • 2013 - 2
  • 2012 - 9