A.S. in Mechanical Engineering Technology

This program provides students with the foundational knowledge to design and develop machines that are efficient, reliable and safe.

Upon graduation, you can expect to pursue entry-level mechanical engineering positions in industries such as aerospace, automotive, biomedical, chemical or industrial research.

At a Glance
64 credit hours
4 semesters
1 elective
How to Apply

There are no special requirements to apply. In order to enroll in the program. All you need to do is select Mechanical Engineering Technology as your major when you apply to Bluefield State College.

How to Earn Your Degree

Your advisor will work with you throughout your academic journey to make sure you're on track to earn your degree. Receiving the A.S. in Mechanical Engineering Technology requires completing the following courses:

Semester 1
MEET 101 Industrial Materials
Course ID
MEET 101
Credit Hours
3

A study of engineering materials used in a technical civilization. Emphasis is placed on metals, but polymers, ceramics, and composites are studied. Major topics of discussion include material properties
and applications. Laboratory experiments are designed to compare the mechanical properties of various materials. Fall.

MEET 111 Engineering Drafting
Course ID
MEET 111
Credit Hours
3

Designed to develop the student’s ability to read and draw orthographic projections including sectional and auxiliary views and freehand sketches. Emphasis is placed on industrial drafting practices including techniques, which show principles of design and fabrication. Dimensioning, notations, and precision in
lettering are also stressed. Fall.

ENGL 101 Composition I
Course ID
ENGL 101
Credit Hours
3

Practice in the techniques of effective academic writing with an emphasis on the writing process, including rhetorical methods, patterns of organization, and an introduction to APA formatting. Available to students scoring 18 or higher on the English section of the ACT, 450 or higher on the verbal portion of the SAT-I, or 88 or higher on the ACCUPLACER Sentences Skills test. Fall, Spring.

GNET 101 Technical Physics I
Course ID
GNET 101
Credit Hours
4

A study of mechanics and heat. Topics discussed include vectors, concurrent and nonconcurrent forces, kinematics and linear motion, work, energy, simple machines, impulse, momentum, thermal expansion, specific heat, and change of state. PR: ACT score in mathematics of 19 or above, or GNET 098 or COMPASS Engineering Math score of 59 or higher. Fall.

GNET 115 Technical Mathematics I
Course ID
GNET 115
Credit Hours
4

A study of fundamental algebraic concepts and operations, functions and graphs, trigonometric functions and their graphs, linear equations and determinants, factoring, fractions, vectors, and triangles. PR: ACT score in mathematics of 19 or above, or GNET 098. Fall.

Semester 2
MEET 112 Computer Aided Drafting
Course ID
MEET 112
Credit Hours
3

General introduction to the principles of computer aided drafting including the study of CAD system components, entity creation, and methods of editing and manipulation, with the major emphasis placed on hands-on practice in the CAD laboratory. Spring.

ENGL 102 Composition II
Course ID
ENGL 102
Credit Hours
3

Continued practice in reading and composition with an emphasis on the research process, including an introduction to literary analysis and MLA format. Students must earn a grade of a C or above or repeat this course to fulfill the general education requirement. PR: C or higher in ENGL 101 or CLEP score of 50 or higher or advanced placement waiving ENGL 101 or ACT English mechanics/usage subtest score of 9 or higher or COMPASS Writing Diagnostics test score of 76 or higher. Fall, Spring.

GNET 102 Technical Physics II
Course ID
GNET 102
Credit Hours
4

A study of the basic concepts of electricity and the application of these concepts to fundamental direct and alternating current circuits. The principles of electromagnetism and electrostatics are also studied and applied to problems involving the production and utilization of electric energy. PR: ACT score in mathematics of 19 or above, or GNET 098. Spring.

GNET 116 Technical Mathematics II
Course ID
GNET 116
Credit Hours
4

A study of exponents and radicals, complex numbers, logarithms, systems of equations, theory of equations, inequalities, determinants, matrices, variations, progressions, properties of trigonometric functions, and inverse trigonometric functions. PR: GNET 115. Spring.

Semester 3
ENGR 201 Statics
Course ID
ENGR 201
Credit Hours
3

Vector mechanics course covering concepts of forces, moments, couples, and resultants; equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; forces in trusses, frames and machines; centroids and centers of mass for lines, areas, and volumes; distributed loads, internal shear-force and bending-moment calculations for beams; dry friction and belt friction; area moments of inertia and the parallel-axis theorem. PR: GNET 101, GNET 116. Fall.

MEET 201 Manufacturing Processes
Course ID
MEET 201
Credit Hours
3

A study of the commonly used methods of manufacturing. These methods include casting, stamping, welding, rolling, forging, extrusion, and machining. Laboratory experiments allow the student to perform actual manufacturing processes. PR: MEET 111. Fall.

MATH 220 Calculus I
Course ID
MATH 220
Credit Hours
4

 A study of elements of plane analytical geometry, including polar coordinates, the derivative of a 
function with applications, integrals and applications, differentiation of transcendental functions, and methods of integration. PR: MATH 109 and MATH 110, or GNET 116, or ACT Mathematics main score of 26 or COMPASS Trigonometry score of 46 or above. Fall, Spring.

COSC 210 Visual Basic
Course ID
COSC 210
Credit Hours
3

An introduction to the Visual BASIC event-driven programming language with emphasis on producing working programs. Includes how to design a Windows-interface, how to set the properties of objects on the interface/form, and how to code, debug, execute and document the actions/behaviors of selected objects. Also includes the coding of structured algorithms to do branching and looping along with other problem solving techniques and the development of an acceptable programming style. PR: GNET 115, MATH 109, or written consent of the instructor.

Elective
Credit Hours
3
Semester 4
ENGR 202 Strength of Materials
Course ID
ENGR 202
Credit Hours
3

Mechanics of materials course covering concepts of normal and shear stress and strain, deformation, factors of safety and stress s, axially-loaded members, torsionally-loaded members, shearing and bending of beams, internal shear-force and bending-moment diagrams, stresses resulting from combined loading, statically-indeterminate loading, thin-walled pressure vessels, stress transformation via equation and Mohr’s circle, beam deflection, column buckling, and thin-walled pressure vessels. PR: ENGR 201. Spring.

MEET 202 Computer Aided Manufacturing
Course ID
MEET 202
Credit Hours
3

A study of the basic concepts of automation. These concepts include machine language computer programming, computer process monitoring, process-computer interfaces, and automation problem solving. The laboratory will consist of team problem solving in automation and the actual operation of CAM system. PR: MEET 201. Spring.

MEET 206 Instrumentation
Course ID
MEET 206
Credit Hours
3

Provides a fundamental background in measurements systems, including the physical principles and practical techniques for setting up instrumentation for engineering applications. The measurements of such physical quantities as time, displacement, stress, strain, force, torque, pressure, flow, temperature, motion, velocity, acceleration and vibrations are discussed. The students will select, design, install, calibrate and perform testing with various instruments in the lab and prepare formal lab reports on the results of the experiments. Digital data acquisition and the use of PC’s with the data acquisition systems will be introduced. PR: GNET 102, CO: ELET 110. Spring.

MEET 214 Hydraulics & Fluid Power
Course ID
MEET 214
Credit Hours
3

Applied fluid mechanics and fluid power. Pascal’s law, the continuity equation and Bernoulli’s Theorem lead to practical applications in fluid power systems. Components are discussed and examined in the laboratory. Hydraulic circuits are set up and analyzed. Trouble shooting and mining machinery applications are introduced. PR: GNET 101. Spring.

ELET 110 Circuit Analysis I
Course ID
ELET 110
Credit Hours
4

A study of the concepts of complex circuit analysis for both direct and alternating current circuits. Topics studied include network theorems, sinusoidal alternating waveforms with basic elements and phases. ELET 112L is the lab component for the course and should be taken simultaneously with ELET 110.CO: ELET 112, GNET 116. PR GNET 102. Spring.

ELET 112L Electrical Measurements
Course ID
ELET 112L
Credit Hours
1

Stresses the practical application of circuit theory presented in ELET 110. The design characteristics of electrical measuring devices including tools, meters and oscilloscopes are discussed and the proper use of these devices in various types of circuits is emphasized. PR: GNET 102, CO: ELET 110. Spring.

Program Educational Objectives

  1. Graduates produce working documents and perform basic analysis and design of system components in support of mechanical design and manufacturing of machine parts.
  2. Graduates function on professional teams and communicate with speaking, writing, and graphical skills.
  3. Graduates respect professional, ethical, and social issues as well as a commitment to quality and dependability.
  4. Graduates remain current, professionally.

Student Outcomes

  1. Students demonstrate an ability to apply the knowledge, techniques, skills, & modern tools of the discipline to narrowly defined mechanical engineering technology activities.
  2. Students demonstrate an ability to apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, & technology to engineering technology problems that require limited application of principles but extensive practical knowledge.
  3. Students demonstrate an ability to conduct standard tests and measurements, & to conduct, analyze, and interpret experiments.
  4. Students demonstrate an ability to function effectively as a member of a technical team.
  5. Students demonstrate an ability to identify, analyze, & solve narrowly defined mechanical engineering technology problems.
  6. Students demonstrate an ability to apply written, oral, and graphical communication in both technical and non-technical environments; and an ability to identify and use appropriate technical literature.
  7. Students demonstrate an understanding of the need for & an ability to engage in self-directed continuing professional development.
  8. Students demonstrate an understanding of & a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities, including a respect for diversity.
  9. Students demonstrate a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement.
  10. Students can apply specific program principles to the specification, installation, fabrication, test, operation, maintenance, sales, or documentation of basic mechanical systems depending on program orientation & the needs of their constituents.

Number of Graduates

  • 2016 - 7
  • 2015 - 2
  • 2014 - 11
  • 2013 - 7
  • 2012 - 7